Lets look at some settiings, so you could enter a list of websites to crawl for expired domains on, or you can enter a search query say you're looking to form a pbn to boost your money site, that's about horse riding or something you could put horse riding down there and then it'll search, Google for horse riding and then crawl all the domains that Google brings back to you. Then we've got endless crawl and you basically you put in a few seed websites and then it will just crawl endlessly from those websites. So it will take all the domains off those websites. First they'll check whether they're expired or not. If they're not expired, then it'll start crawling them and then it will crawl the ones it finds from them and so on so on and so on. It will just keep going ok.

Screenshot A screenshot (also known as a thumbnail) is a reduced size version of a picture. DomainTools' Screenshot History shows you archived images of what a specific website looks like currently and what it looked like in the past, from as far back as 2001. Shared Registration System (SRS) The Shared Registration System (SRS) is the software provided by a registry to facilitate the registration of domain names, updates of nameservers, contact information and overall management of a registry. The SRS is used by registrars to connect to the registry. SLD SLD refers to Second Level Domain, which are the characters immediately to the left of the main domain extension (TLD). The term is typically used when differentiating between a TLD and SLD. For example, in domaintools.com, domaintools is the SLD and .com is the TLD. SPF Record Sender Policy Framework records are used to identify Internet hosts that are allowed to send mail for a particular domain. An SPF Record is put in the same level as an MX Record. When an SPF Record is present, a properly configured mail server will not accept mail from servers not listed in that record. By configuring your mail server to respect SPF records, you can reduce the amount of unsolicited emails that use spoofed sender data. Sponsor A Sponsor is an organization to which is delegated some defined ongoing policy-formulation authority regarding the manner in which a particular sponsored TLD is operated. The sponsored TLD has a Charter, which defines the purpose for which the sponsored TLD has been created and will be operated. The Sponsor is responsible for developing policies on the delegated topics so that the TLD is operated for the benefit of a defined group of stakeholders, known as the Sponsored TLD Community, that are most directly interested in the operation of the TLD. The Sponsor also is responsible for selecting the registry operator and to varying degrees for establishing the roles played by registrars and their relationship with the registry operator. The Sponsor must exercise its delegated authority according to fairness standards and in a manner that is representative of the Sponsored TLD Community. Subdomain A subdomain is a domain that is a component of a larger domain. For example, mail.domaintools.com and calendar.domaintools.com are subdomains of the domaintools.com domain, which in turn is a subdomain of the .com top level domain (TLD). Thick Registry With a thick domain registry model, all information associated with registered entities, including both technical information (such as information needed to produce zone files) and social information (such as information needed to implement operational, business, or legal practices), is stored within the registrar repository. Thin Registry With a thin registry model, only the operational data about each domain (such as information to produce zone files) is stored in the central registry database, while contact and billing information is maintained by the registrar sponsoring the domain name. Thus, in this model, the registry only knows the mapping from a domain name to a registrar as well as the associated nameservers. Whois services operated by the registry publish that mapping, while the registrant's identity is then published by the registrar. Note: If you need Whois information, visit DomainTools' Whois page. Top Level Domain (TLD) Top Level Domains (TLDs) are the names at the top of the DNS naming hierarchy. They appear in domain names as the string of letters following the last (rightmost) ".", such as "net" in "www.example.net". The administrator for a TLD controls what second-level names are recognized in that TLD. The administrators of the "root domain" or "root zone" control what TLDs are recognized by the DNS. Generally speaking, two types of TLDs exist: generic TLDs (such as .com, .net, .edu) and country code TLDs (such as .jp, .de, and .cn). UDRP The UDRP stands for Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy. It is a policy adopted by ICANN in 1999 to resolve domain name disputes in the case of abusive registrations or trademark infringement. Anyone who registers a domain name with a global TLD must agree to this policy, and it makes things easier and less expensive for trademark owners to resolve a dispute. Once a UDRP complaint is filed, a panel of 1 to 3 panelists will review the case. If the complainant (i.e. the person or organization filing the infringement or abuse complaint) wins the UDRP case, the domain name may be transferred to them. No action is taken if the respondent (i.e. the original owner) wins the UDRP case. To review the policy and see a list of past UDRP proceedings, visit: http://www.icann.org/en/udrp/udrp.htm. URL URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator that distinguishes where an identified resource is available along with the mechanism for retrieving it. An example of the use of a URL is for web page addresses on the World Wide Web, such as http://www.example.com. Whois Whois is a widely used Internet directory that tells you who owns a domain and how to get in contact with the them. Due to the policies implemented and enforced by (the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the agency whose job it is to regulate domain name registration, the Whois record serves a comprehensive snapshot of domain name registration and ownership, including registrant, administrative, billing and technical contact information provided by registrars for domain name registrations.
HostGator often offers promotions, coupons and special offers to customers during their initial term. Please note that special offers are limited-time promotional prices that are available to new customers and are valid for the Initial Term only, and not for successive or renewal periods. Promotional rates apply to GATOR, Shared, Cloud, VPS, Dedicated, WordPress and Reseller hosting plans and will automatically renew after initial term at regular rate found in your control panel. Note: If you register a free domain through us and wish to cancel your account, there is a fee to retain your domain.
Yes, we port in all of the domains from NameJet, SnapNames, etc. There are a lot of great deals to be found. Some are absolute trash of course but if you can sift through them and put some time in (hopefully that is what we are trying to do with our tools is save time and give some value add with the SEO metrics, alerts, etc.) then you can find some great bargains.
If you buy keyword specific domains, you're really buying the type in traffic.  I use the URL builder and redirect through that URL so you can see how much traffic your getting from the keyword domain.  There seems to be no rythme or reason to what keyword domains deliver traffic and what don't.  By tracking traffic with the Google URL builder you get a feel for what names are giving you traffic and which are not. ie. the plural, the singular, two words, three words, the possessive, etc.
For many reasons, these domain names expire and become available to the market. Perhaps the domain renewal fees are unpaid. The owner no longer needs the domain or business came to a halt. With the large pool of domain names that become invalid daily, investors who are looking to cash in on the traffic that they generate have to do extra work to find the most profitable every day. The trick is to find expired domains.

I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.
Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
Finding good aged high DA domains with natural links for SEO and filtering them through our expired domain tools is really easy. Contact us with your SEO or PBN needs to receive an offer. If you need domains for a private blog network, 301 redirects or other SEO strategies, then contact us!. Our pool is huge but so many domains are being bought that it’s diminishing at a fast rate.
Why does this matter? What's the big deal? Well, unfortunately, the vast majority of domains registered are eventually abandoned. For some reason or another, people just fail to re-register or renew their domain name and that domain name drops or becomes available to the public. Of course, the obvious reason is that these people simply did not make money off the website that they put up with that domain. Other bloggers and website owners simply don't have the time, so they just gave up on their online projects. Whatever the case may be, by simply registering these expired domains, you can resurrect the value they bring to the table. With the four situations that I outlined above, you can benefit from those situations by simply registering a drop domain.
They are easy to type and remember: You can’t get a easy to remember new domain name without paying huge bucks these days. Gone are the days where you can simply grab almost any incredible domain name just by paying a couple of bucks. This is one of the major reasons most people look for expired domains because most expired domains are short and sweet.
.ac .ae .af .ag .am .ar .as .at .au .aw .ax .be .bg .bi .bj .bn .bo .br .bw .by .bz .ca .cc .ch .ci .cl .cn .co .cr .cx .cz .de .dk .dm .do .ee .es .fi .fm .fo .fr .gd .gg .gi .gl .gs .gy .hk .hn .hr .ht .hu .id .ie .il .im .in .io .iq .ir .is .it .je .jp .ke .kg .ki .kr .ky .kz .la .lc .li .lt .lu .lv .ly .ma .md .me .mg .mk .mn .ms .mu .mx .nl .nc .nf .ng .no .nu .nz .om .pe .pf .pl .pm .pr .pt .pw .qa .re .ro .rs .ru .rw .sb .sc .se .sg .sh .si .sk .sm .sn .so .st .su .sx .tc .tf .th .tl .tn .to .tr .tv .tw .ua .ug .uk .us .uy .uz .vc .wf .yt .za
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