AGP AGP is the acronym for Add Grace Period. It refers to the 5 day period after an initial domain name registration in which time a registrar would be able to cancel any registration without incurring an expense. Originally, this 5 day grace period was put in place to help protect registrars from incurring an expense in case domains are registered with bad payments, credit card fraud, etc. API API stands for Application Programming Interface. It is an interface that has been implemented by a software program, enabling it to interact with additional software. Similar to how a user interface facilitates interaction between computers and humans, an API facilitates interaction between software programs. Instead of writing functions from scratch, the API allows programmers to use predefined functions to interact with the operating system. End users also benefit, since all programs using the API will have a similar user interface. AREC (A-Record) AREC, also known as A-Record, is the term used for 'Address Records' in DNS. The purpose of the A-Record is to map a domain name or hostname to its numeric IP address, handled at the name server on which the domain name lives. For example, the A Record may map the domain google.com to 209.85.171.99 (just one of Google's many IP addresses). Backend Registry Operator (BRO)See RegistryBackorder (Domain) A Backorder, often referred to as a domain backorder, is the process of submitting a request to purchase a currently registered domain name. In order to backorder a domain, a service that specializes in domain backorders must be used. The benefit of using a backorder service is that users increase their chances of registering the domain before others. Some registrars provide backorder services to domains that they manage. Backorder services typically charge a flat fee, but in the event that there is more than one potential buyer, they may sell in an auction format. Country Code Top Level Domain (ccTLD) ccTLD is an abbreviation for country code Top Level Domains. They are domains that have two letters to the right of the last period in a domain name, such as in www.domainname.au (Australia), www.domainname.ar (Argentina) and www.domainname.jp (Japan), are top level Internet domains that correspond to a sovereign state, territory, or other geographic location. They can also contain 4 letters such as CO.UK. See IANA country code Top Level Domains for a complete list of current ccTLDs. CName Record A CName record, or Canonical Name record, is a record in the Domain Name System (DNS) that defines that one domain name is an alias of another canonical domain name. This is helpful when running multiple services from just one IP address. CNames are often used with subdomains and it can be useful when redirecting traffic from from a non-www. version of your domain name to a www. version of your domain name. For example, you can set up a CName so that visitors to http://things.example.com, would direct to http://www.example.com. Cybersquatting Cybersquatting refers to the act of knowingly managing a domain name that is confusingly similar or matches an established trademark. Therefore, the term cybersquatter refers to the organization or individual that is engaging in the cybersquatting. Note that domaining and cybersquatting have been incorrectly confused by some media sources, though it's important to know that the terms are not the same. Direct Navigation (Type In Traffic) Direct Navigation, also known as "Type-In Traffic", refers to when users type a web address into the browser URL bar, bypassing search engines or other types of Internet links. This common practice heavily contributed to the tremendous value of strong keyword domain names and the overall growth of the domain name market. Direct navigation is basically 'free' Internet traffic to a given domain name. Dmoz Dmoz (which stems from it's original domain name of directory.mozilla.org) is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links that is also known as Open Directory Project (ODP). Dmoz is constructed and maintained by a global community of volunteer editors.
Ultimately, I was left with a semi-automated process of scraping sites and running an intricate series of processes to come up with a list of expired domains that I then had to evaluate by hand. This meant I had Majestic and Moz open to check the backlink anchor text and Archive.org to check for obvious spam for every single possible domain. The process was excruciatingly slow and tedious, but absolutely necessary to find domains that would be suitable for building out.
The database also gives us the chance to analyse Whois, IP, NS, MX records and website content of every domain and to offer unique investigation and brand monitoring services for which websites like Whois.Domaintools.com charge a lot of money. With the tools we have developed we can offer Reverse IP, Whois investigation and B2B research in bulk at a world class quality/price ratio.

Hey, what’s up everybody. It’s Brian Dean from Quick Sprout. In this video, I’m going to show you how to buy affordable expired domains and how to evaluate the potential value that an expired domain could bring to your site. Now, expired domains is pretty gray hat, black hat type of thing because there’s basically two things you’re going to do in an expired domain.


When the domain drops, the minute it drops, literally, they will try to get it and if you can get it, it’s yours. So, that’s it for expired domains. You can see it’s a little bit complicated and it takes some leg work, but if you’re interested in building a publisher network or a private blog network, this is a great way to find sites that have a great link profile without you having to actually build any links. So, that’s it for this video. I’ll see you in the next one.
Referring domains for anchor phrases usually reveals similar information. What you really want to look out for is whether or not the site has been picked up by a spammer in the past. A lot of times these expired domains were dropped, picked up by a website owner who then tried to rank it for keywords like Viagra, Cialis and whatever. You obviously don’t want that kind of domain.
As an Internet marketing strategy, SEO takes into account what people search for and how search engines work. Optimizing a website may include editing content, HTML, and associated coding to both remove barriers to the indexing activities of search engines and increase its relevance to specific keywords. Another SEO tactic is to promote a site to increase the number of inbound links (also known as backlinks).
Searching for a suitable domain name for your website can be quite trying. The reason for this is that the names that you want to get have already been assigned and are not available. As an SEO you know the importance of getting a domain name that describes your business as closely as possible. For example, if you are running a car rental service, you will look for a domain name that has the words ‘car’ and ‘rental’ in it. So if you can’t find a suitable name, you could use the expired domains tool which might show you domain names that would meet your requirements.
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