DomCop has a great offer that all of you buying expired domains should consider. For the price of a couple domain names, you can use DomCop for a month, snag some excellent domain names, which would otherwise cost you thousands of dollars. If you're considering expired domain software and don't have the knowledge to program your own crawler, I'd lean towards DomCop.
However, Pool uses what some have called a “two-phase” auction system. This means that once you win your original backorder, Pool will then move you into the auction phase where you compete with other bidders for the domain. Pool doesn’t reveal how many bidders there are or what they’re bidding, so you have to offer the highest price you’re willing to if you want to get that dream domain.
Finally, if you were to manually check for drop domains, you have to jump through many hoops. It's a very labor intensive and often confusing process. When you see that a domain name is available, you shouldn’t just stop there. You should also pay attention to how many backlinks it had, how niche-specific the domain is, what kind of websites link to it, did it get signals from social media, and other indicators of quality. If you were to try to look for drop domains manually, it can be a very, very intimidating process. Thankfully, there is an easier solution.
Of course, this does not happen equally across the board. Some site owners are lazy and barely put in any effort. As you can probably tell, the four situations I outlined above probably will not occur for website owners who are lazy. Now, for website owners who put in the work and the time for their online properties, you can bet that they would get to benefit from the four situations outlined above.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
So, let's start off with the simple website list crawl. So settings for this is covered by the general crawl settings and these apply to all the other types of crawl as well, such as the Search crawl and the Endless cruel, so pretty simple really. Delay between each request to a website. One second, this is in seconds. Secondly, concurrent websites crawl how many websites you want to crawl at any one point in time and then how many threads will concurrently crawl per website. So that's ten, a crawl of ten websites at once, and each of those websites there's three different threads crawling. That's 30 concurrent connections you've got going.

Now the numbers of errors, for we give up crawling a web site in case you know, they've got some kind of anti scraping technology or the web sites just completely knackered or something thirty is generally fine. Limit number of pages crawled per website most the time you want that ticked. I have it about a hundred thousand less you are going to be crawling some particularly big websites. I like that there, because, if you have an endless, crawl and there's some kind of weird URL structure on a website like an old-school date picker or something you don't want to be endlessly stuck on that website. Show your URLs being crawled. Now, if you just want to see what it's doing, you can have it on for debugging sometimes, but I generally leave it off because it makes it slightly faster and writes results into a text file so as it goes along and it finds expired domains as well as showing you and the GUI here, you can write them into a text file just in case there's a crash or your PC shuts down or something like that.

Backlinks – These are basically anchor links present on external websites that take the visitor back to a domain. The higher the number and authority of backlinks, the higher the authority of a domain. For example, if a domain has a backlink from Forbes, TechCrunch or BBC, it’ll gain a lot of authority in the eyes of Google and other search engines. It’s like attaching a reference letter from Bill Gates to your CV.
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What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.

The bottom line is, drop domains deliver traffic. How come? When people register a drop domain and build a website on that domain, they often attract backlinks. They also can update their website and generate a community or a brand. Whatever the case is, there are four things that happen that results in traffic for those websites. They create a backlink footprint, which drives direct traffic. This backlink footprint also produces SEO benefits. The more these website owners promote their website, the more goodwill they build up in their target niches and online communities. Finally, the more they manage their online blog, website or information site, they gain some sort of presence on social media.
Surely if you purchase a domain (domain1.com) and redirect it to your existing domain (domain2.com) you expect to loose all ranking for domain1.com. If 301's are used then the objective is simply to pass on authority, not dominate the search results with 2 domains. If you want to keep domain2.com in the index then you would take Rebecca's option 2 or 3.

In the mid-1990's, Webmasters and content providers began optimizing websites for search engines just as content was being cataloged by search engines. At that time, it was sufficient enough for a webmaster to send a URL to various search engines which would trigger a "spider" to "crawl" that page, extract links to other pages from it, and return information from the page to be indexed. However, site owners began recognizing the value of having a highly ranked site that is visible in search engine results, creating an opportunity for SEO practitioners and practices to be considered for strategic purposes.
Registry The registry is the master database of all domain names registered in each Top Level Domain (TLD). The registry operator maintains the master database of information and also generates the zone file that allows computers to route Internet traffic to and from top level domains anywhere in the world. Users can register Top Level Domains by using an ICANN -Accredited Registrar. For example, Verisign is the registry for .com and .net among other TLDs. Reverse IP Reverse IP is a way to identify which web sites are hosted on the same web server by checking a domain name or IP address. DomainTools has a Reverse IP tool that can help you identify this information - visit the Reverse IP webpage to get started. Reverse Whois Reverse Whois is a reverse DNS lookup that allows you to query DNS servers for current and historical domain records by email addresses, phone numbers, and street addresses. Root The root is the list of names and addresses of authoritative servers for TLDs. The root exists above the TLDs and defines a given name space by identifying the nameservers that will answer authoritatively for a TLD. ICANN, for example, manages the root on which the great majority of Internet traffic flows. It is possible to have more than one root and in fact some alternate root servers do exist, but have not gained much popularity to date. The root that ICANN manages is centrally managed, but service of the root zone file is provided by a series of geographically and operationally diverse root servers. Root Nameserver A root nameserver is a DNS server that answers requests for the DNS root zone, and redirects requests for a particular TLD to that TLD's nameservers. Although any local implementation of DNS can implement its own private root nameservers, the term "root nameserver" is generally used to describeserver that make up the Domain Name System. SEO SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization. It's the process of improving unpaid or "natural" ranking of a website or webpage in search engine results. SEO targets different types of search, including video search, image search, and industry-specific vertical search engines. The results of the different types of search help to give websites web presence.

The database also gives us the chance to analyse Whois, IP, NS, MX records and website content of every domain and to offer unique investigation and brand monitoring services for which websites like Whois.Domaintools.com charge a lot of money. With the tools we have developed we can offer Reverse IP, Whois investigation and B2B research in bulk at a world class quality/price ratio.
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