The way this list is implemented means I can't update prices, nor removed sold domains automatically and sedo doesn't provide me with the tools I need to implement it properly. Unfortunately some users keep contacting me to update their domain prices or remove their domains and I can't keep doing that manually. So I've decided to disable the list for now.

A brand new domain, for instance, will have to wait for a few days before getting indexed by Google and other search engines, and then its owner will need to go through the tedious process of search engine optimization, which takes time and financial resources. High authority expired domain names on the other hand, offer a short cut and allow you to get down to business straight away.
Social Media Authority comprises of the number of times your domain is mentioned on the social network. In regular SEO we would call that a backlink, but when it comes to social networks, it’s more common to call it a “social signal”. Google won’t consider that link as a backlink, but it will note that the domain was mentioned – meaning, it will receive a “social signal”.
Surely if you purchase a domain (domain1.com) and redirect it to your existing domain (domain2.com) you expect to loose all ranking for domain1.com. If 301's are used then the objective is simply to pass on authority, not dominate the search results with 2 domains. If you want to keep domain2.com in the index then you would take Rebecca's option 2 or 3.

This is a little bit on the grey hat/black hat side of the spectrum. But the fact is building a blog network with expired domains flat out works. The only issue is getting those cream of the crop domains without going broke. This video will walk you through tested strategies and techniques you can use to find powerful, yet affordable, expired domains.
What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.
I am trying to find the auction house partnered with “Registration Technologies, Inc.” (http://registrationtek.com/). They appear ancient, but still active. I have attempted to contact them and received no response to my queries. How would I go about finding the auction house they are partnered with? Are you certain that all auctioning partnerships are exclusive?

Yes, I know, it seems backwards that you’d have to compete in an auction for a domain name that may never be caught. Other people feel the same way and many don’t compete as a result of that. But that’s the way the drop catching service was set up. Who knows, it may mean less competition for you since others do not like that model, which benefits the company rather than the user.
Hundreds of thousands of domains expire everyday. While most of them are trash, quite a few are aged domains having excellent backlinks. These can be easily filtered using metrics from Majestic (Trust Flow) & Moz (Domain Authority). These are great for your money sites or for building private blog networks. Some of these domains have natural organic traffic, that can be determined by their SEMrush rank or the SimilarWeb data. These are great for domain parking or for promoting affiliate offers.
I registered for backordering with GoDaddy last year, as i saw goddady was the registar of the domain i wanted. However when the deadline for renewal came, i got a message the expiration date had changed to expire… well, a year later, i.e. now in 4 days. How can the expiration date be postponed? Was that the registrant renewed? does that mean the domain never becomes available and never goes to auction?
Since high quality expired domains are in low supply, the huge numbers of marketers competing for those drop domains tend to drive prices up. Also, if you use an exchange, you’re basically lucky to get whatever you can afford. In other words, niche specificity isn't guaranteed. This is going to be a problem because as Google continues to evolve, it is cracking down on domain niche relevance. In other words, its software is fast evolving to the point that it can tell what the niche of a particular domain is. If your private blog network is a patchwork of expired domains that involve many different and dissimilar niches, then you might be in trouble. You are at great risk of being penalized by Google.
One of the ways to make the most of this strategy is to sign up for Mobidea. Whatever expired domain you may have, there are high odds that Mobidea would have an offer that’s relevant to your domain’s niche. You simply host your website on the expired domain, place Mobidea’s offers on your website and whenever you make a sale through your website, you receive an affiliate commission!
Social Media Authority comprises of the number of times your domain is mentioned on the social network. In regular SEO we would call that a backlink, but when it comes to social networks, it’s more common to call it a “social signal”. Google won’t consider that link as a backlink, but it will note that the domain was mentioned – meaning, it will receive a “social signal”.

This is not the case at GoDaddy Auctions, however. There, GoDaddy starts the auction before the domain names has fully expired and the registrant does have the ability to pay a one-time restoration fee to restore ownership. This is particularly frustrating to those bidding in the auction, as you may be the winning bidder and pay your winning bid price only to find out a few days later that it was restored. You then have to wait for a refund from GoDaddy.
The third option is the one that's the most time consuming but also has its benefits. It's like having a successful restaurant and buying another restaurant and operating them simultaneously. They're not the exact same restaurant, but both are popular in their own right and make you money. The same goes for Option #3. You could update the content on the old domain and sell the same products that you're selling on your current site. If you can get both sites to rank alongside each other in the SERPs, you're increasing your conversion chances and sales potential.
If you buy keyword specific domains, you're really buying the type in traffic.  I use the URL builder and redirect through that URL so you can see how much traffic your getting from the keyword domain.  There seems to be no rythme or reason to what keyword domains deliver traffic and what don't.  By tracking traffic with the Google URL builder you get a feel for what names are giving you traffic and which are not. ie. the plural, the singular, two words, three words, the possessive, etc.

The first is the link profile I and actually took this example carbondsystems.com because it looked like a pretty good choice. It’s from 2003. It has some links, some age and it’s in DMAS and looked at the link profile in DMAS. So, you just copy and paste the domain,  the home page it to here, click on the search links button and this will show you all the links to that site.
i had a backorder for a domian that was registered at godaddy. The backorder of the domain says the domain expires feb 23, 2015. However, when i check the whois on different websites, it now says the domain is registered through feb 2016. However, GODADDY back ordering still has the domain with the expiration date of feb 23, 2015. Why would they be showing 2 different dates? The domain is not even in an auction, so the 2016 seems like the new correct date?

I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.


Thousands of domain names expire every day. The reasons are different. Some owners forgot to renew the domains, some just don't want them anymore or they moved on to other projects. For most people these so called Expired Domains don't have any value. They just see a bunch of Domain Names someone else deleted and move on, but for the people who know about SEO or the value of good Backlinks, Expired Domain Names are money just waiting to get picked up from the street. The only problem is to separate the good ones from the bad ones. That is where ExpiredDomains.net comes into play.
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