The bottom line is, drop domains deliver traffic. How come? When people register a drop domain and build a website on that domain, they often attract backlinks. They also can update their website and generate a community or a brand. Whatever the case is, there are four things that happen that results in traffic for those websites. They create a backlink footprint, which drives direct traffic. This backlink footprint also produces SEO benefits. The more these website owners promote their website, the more goodwill they build up in their target niches and online communities. Finally, the more they manage their online blog, website or information site, they gain some sort of presence on social media.

The other way you could profit off expired domain names is redirecting the traffic to your affiliate link. For illustration, if you have an affiliate link that sells beauty products, and the expired domain name was mentioned or ranked in a high authority website for terms related to beauty products you can redirect the traffic there to make sales. One sale is enough to make you a decent profit.

Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).


Next, some of these expired domain names have ranked in high authority sites that are ranked or had ranked themselves. Besides, some of these domain names are worth a fortune. For example, domain names sell for about ten to twenty dollars each. However, those that are the most sought after can go for over $ 2500 a month because they have lots of traffic back links or rankings.The last advantage is that you don’t have to spend much to find expired domains.
To get the most from GoDaddy Auctions, you should first decide on the way you want to evaluate the domains. Domainers tend to look at the words in the domain name, while SEOs care about the backlink equity. If you are a domainer, you should look at Estibot, Domain Index or Valuate scores. If you are an SEO, you should look at the Ahrefs, Moz and Majestic metrics to gauge the value of the backlinks. Once you have figured this out, you should look at these numbers for every domain you find on GoDaddy Auctions. Do not be afraid of bidding on the Closeout auctions, as you can get good domains for cheap.
If you are pursuing option 1, then you will want to use an automated service for the reasons mentioned in the article. Follow the process in the article to see which registrar the domain name is located at. If it’s at a Auction House like GoDaddy, NameJet or SnapNames, I believe they publicly share if there is a backorder on a domain name but not who placed that backorder. (Any interest in a domain name may be enough for someone else to place a backorder, thereby driving interest in the domain name that may be visible to the registrant.) So if the domain is at a registrar partnered with one of these companies, then you’ll have to monitor it manually (via calendar entries based on the whois expiration data) to maintain your distance.
Since high quality expired domains are in low supply, the huge numbers of marketers competing for those drop domains tend to drive prices up. Also, if you use an exchange, you’re basically lucky to get whatever you can afford. In other words, niche specificity isn't guaranteed. This is going to be a problem because as Google continues to evolve, it is cracking down on domain niche relevance. In other words, its software is fast evolving to the point that it can tell what the niche of a particular domain is. If your private blog network is a patchwork of expired domains that involve many different and dissimilar niches, then you might be in trouble. You are at great risk of being penalized by Google.
Hey, what’s up everybody. It’s Brian Dean from Quick Sprout. In this video, I’m going to show you how to buy affordable expired domains and how to evaluate the potential value that an expired domain could bring to your site. Now, expired domains is pretty gray hat, black hat type of thing because there’s basically two things you’re going to do in an expired domain.
What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.
I want to purchase a domain name that is to expire very soon. After looking it up on Whois, the owner is revealed to be 1 and 1, which doesn’t have a designated auction house based on your chart above. How should I go about trying to buy this? Because I don’t know if it will go to auction, and if it does, which auction house I should look at. It is set to expire soon: 2015-09-21
The way this list is implemented means I can't update prices, nor removed sold domains automatically and sedo doesn't provide me with the tools I need to implement it properly. Unfortunately some users keep contacting me to update their domain prices or remove their domains and I can't keep doing that manually. So I've decided to disable the list for now.
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