Answer: Yes. For a vast majority of domain names that expire (greater than 99%+), the rules and processes listed above are valid. However, there appear to be exceptions to these rules. For example, registrars “warehouse” or take for their own domain name portfolios some domain names, and other domain names a renewed even past their expired or redemption periods. In addition, there is at least one registrar that does not have an auction partner, allowing expired domain names to simply drop and be available for hand register.
If you bid at NameJet *after* the domain name moves to Pending Delete status, then it’s too late for NameJet to take advantage of their relationship with eNom and take control of the name. So then eNom thinks, “no interest from NameJet users; we’ll just drop it” and it goes through the regular deletion process — where the fastest fingers can register it. In some cases, investors don’t want to pay the $59 or $69 fee at NameJet and if there are no bids they can likely get it for $18.99 at Pheenix or using other dropcatching services.
Great post! I tried to repurpose an expired domain to build an authority site (your method 1) – but it doesn’t rank as it should. i checked the backlink profile via majestic and archive.org and it’s clean. also checked the metrics of the competition. with the amount of trust and link juice my expired domain has vs. the competition, it should be on page 1 for those keywords. is there something i’m missing here?

As you can see just within expired domains they have over two million deleted .com domains. Now, this is obviously overwhelming if you’re trying to look for domains. So, you should use a few filters to make the search process a lot easier. To do that, click on the search filter button. Down here I like to click on the Only With A DMAS Entry because that just filters out sites that are really spammy. For sites that that have been in DMAS ever, it means that the site had to be of some quality.
By strategically buying expired domain names which have certain quality features, you can create a link "pump" to your target sites. From an SEO perspective, this can turbo charge your rankings on Google and other search engines. Also, you can make money directly by promoting products on high ranking search results. Additionally, you can make money by selling links on your network to people looking to get an SEO boost.
What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
The dropdate for the following TLDs is not verified. Domains might drop earlier or later: .eu .cat .travel .ae .af .as .at .aw .be .bg .bi .bj .bo .bw .cl .co .cx .cz .dk .dm .es .fi .fo .fr .gd .gg .gi .hk .hr .hu .ie .io .iq .ir .je .jp .ki .kz .lt .lu .lv .md .mg .mx .nl .nc .nf .no .nz .pe .pf .pl .pt .ru .sg .si .sm .sn .so .st .su .sx .to .uk .uz .za .berlin .cloud
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