Domain Hunter Gatherer also makes expired domain detection less painful. As I've mentioned above, finding drop domains on your own can be like taking shots in the dark, or trying to find a needle in a haystack. You’re more than welcome to try it, but I’m telling you, it’s not going to be a pleasant experience. With Domain Hunter Gatherer, you have many different options on how to search for drop domains. You can enter a search term and it will spit out sites that you can then crawl for dead links. You can then filter these dead links to see if they can be registered. You can also enter a site URL of a competitor and get dead links that way. You can even import web pages from Wikipedia or other websites to scan for dead links.
The biggest advantage of using expired domain names to earn cash online is that they belonged to a website that had already establish, registered with several search engines companies and has existing backlinks and traffic. In general, by making use of expired domain names you tap into the resources that were created by someone else to get rich within a short time unlike when you do all the dirty work to get your website recognized immediately.
1. Some domain names don’t go to auction and are instead held by the registrar in their own portfolios (you called this “warehousing” by the registrar). This is probably less than 0.001% of the domain names….actually, probably even less. I suspect it would only be premium domain names with massive exact match local search quantities. Not surprisingly, I cannot find any information from registrars about their procedure, quantities of domains their keep, or ICANN’s rules (if any) about this.
Answer: Registrars are not set-up to negotiate the selling price of expiring domain names. Their technical support team likely won’t even know what you’re referring to, let alone who to refer your inquiry to. It’s likely your offer won’t even be worth their time to handle. Unless you know the founder, president or chief operating officer of the registrar, you won’t even be able to have a dialogue about it. In addition, depending on how they interpret the ICANN registrar rules, it may not even be possible.
Some people might want to skip that because they think that they've already been crawled, which is a possibility and you can apply a manual exclusion to any results you think are going to be returned on Google for your search query. So things like YouTube, you don't want to crawl, then you can add them in there and it will ignore them if they returned in the search results. Okay, so that's yeah! That's pretty much the search setting query settings here. So your search terms go here. You can have as many as you like just enter them in their line separated.
While getting a new domain name will give your site a clean slate and allow you to start a fresh marketing campaign, you may not be aware of the fact that some expired domains come with a high Page Rank value. A company that buys such a domain will not have to work so hard on website promotion and backlink building techniques. Thanks for updating this really informative post!
Backorders don’t take place if a domain name expires at a registrar that has an auction partner, unless no bids are placed at that auction partner prior to the expiration date. Backorders (when domains are “caught”) only happen when a domain name goes through the full lifecycle and expires, is removed from the registry’s database, and becomes available for new registration.

This is not the case at GoDaddy Auctions, however. There, GoDaddy starts the auction before the domain names has fully expired and the registrant does have the ability to pay a one-time restoration fee to restore ownership. This is particularly frustrating to those bidding in the auction, as you may be the winning bidder and pay your winning bid price only to find out a few days later that it was restored. You then have to wait for a refund from GoDaddy.
The easiest and least time consuming option is to 301 redirect the old domain to your existing site. This tactic obviously works best if both sites are in the same sector and are targeting the same keywords; otherwise, if you have a pet supply site and you buy an old Texas Hold 'Em poker site, a redirect probably might raise some eyebrows among the search engines. If, however, your site is brandnamepets.com and you buy onlinepetsupply.com and 301 redirect the domain over, you're inheriting a lot of topical and appropriate links.
The bottom line is, drop domains deliver traffic. How come? When people register a drop domain and build a website on that domain, they often attract backlinks. They also can update their website and generate a community or a brand. Whatever the case is, there are four things that happen that results in traffic for those websites. They create a backlink footprint, which drives direct traffic. This backlink footprint also produces SEO benefits. The more these website owners promote their website, the more goodwill they build up in their target niches and online communities. Finally, the more they manage their online blog, website or information site, they gain some sort of presence on social media.

Thanks, Michael. I cannot find the auction site house of this registrar. It IS up for auction, but it’s NOT fully expired nor dropped – so it appears as though using an automated domain name backorder service may not be the best course of action. The URL still renews every year and is not set to expire until June 2016. The registrar is DOMREG LTD and seems to be tied in to LIBRIS.com. Any suggestions? I just need to ensure my $ is going to the actual entity that’ll grant me the URL. I’m unclear how to avoid paying $ for the URL to a company/service that can’t actually do anything for me (i.e., getting ripped off). Thanks for any direction you can offer.


What you really want to do first is scroll down to where it says, referring pages for anchor phrases. All that is is the anchor text distribution to that site. As you can see here this looks like a very natural link profile. Brand name, a product that they had, no text, URL, shopping cart, wireless government. These are the keywords that were related to what that site was about. Okay?
For example, placing your backorder at NameJet will reveal your interest to other potential buyers so if no other backorders are present you should wait until the last possible moment before the deadline to place your backorder — because if you’re the only backorder, you’ll get it for the minimum $39 bid on expiring names and it won’t go to auction.
I am really new to all this. I am about to launch my blog in the next week. I have a domain and a wordpress blog set ready to go. Clearly it will have no traffic from day one and I guess it will take a while to build up. So my question is would you advise a begginer like me to stick with the one blog for a while and build it up. Or is it worth investing the time early on to master how to find expired domains and link them to the blog?

Trust flow refers to the number of quality backlinks that a website has. If backlinks from websites that have a high domain and authority ranking point to your site; your website’s trust flow will increase. Trust flow is also measured on a scale of 1 to 100. If your website has a large number of backlinks, but they are not from trustworthy and reliable domains, your websites trust flow will be low. On the other hand, if you even have just a handful of backlinks to sites that search engines rank highly; your trust flow will increase.

When you are searching for the expired domain which you might consider buying, you can conduct expired domains search and learn how to buy expired domains. Or you can take an easier route and go to searchenginereports.net from your browser’s search bar. Once you are on the site, click on the ‘Free SEO Tools’ icon. Scroll down the list of free SEO tools icons till you come to ‘Expired Domains Tool’ icon.
Hi Kulwant, these are great tips as usual. I particularly like the way to tell us to check the google pagerank in case the domain has been banned – that could lower the usefulness of the domain quite a bit. One thing though, don’t you think that buying domains is sometimes immoral? Like sometimes you accidentally buy a domain of somebody elses website who forgot to renew.
What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
Let’s just say for example we wanted this site, crystalgiftsworld.com. It looked good based on our analysis and we’d head over to Snap Names, Nameja is another one and what these service do is they have special technology on their site that allows them to try  to register a domain on your behalf over and over again. Okay? If you tried to do that your IP would get banned, but they have some system where they know how to do it just enough to get the domain, but not enough to get blacklisted.
The better quality links (From Google, Wikipedia) that a website has the higher will be its domain authority. New websites start with a ranking of one, and as the number of links increase the domain authority rises. For example, a sports website that has links to sports newspapers and sports reporting sites will have a higher domain authority than a sports website that only has links to other sports and sports blogging sites.
If it contains any of those, then I am going to crawl it. Otherwise, I'm not going to because it's probably just something like an Amazon listing. Okay lets move on to the endless cruel. So this is the endless crawl. Basically, here you put your seed websites, one will do if it's a big website, because there's probably loads of domains on it. If it's a tiny, tiny a website, then you might want to stick a few more in so, as I was saying before, it will crawl on all the pages on these websites and then for each external domain that it finds on that website. It will check whether it's expired if it's not expired, it'll try and crawl it and then it will start the loop again, it'll try and take all the domains from there check that they are expired.
Referring domains for anchor phrases usually reveals similar information. What you really want to look out for is whether or not the site has been picked up by a spammer in the past. A lot of times these expired domains were dropped, picked up by a website owner who then tried to rank it for keywords like Viagra, Cialis and whatever. You obviously don’t want that kind of domain.
Most popular auctions with expiring domains are at godaddy, namejet, snapnames. Search for expired domains name its very easy if you have domains list. With a bit luck, you can drop good one with PR5 cheaper like $200, just need to know which domain have not fake pr. List of domains are not free, but updated dailly with aprox. 50.000 new expiring domain names.
Most popular auctions with expiring domains are at godaddy, namejet, snapnames. Search for expired domains name its very easy if you have domains list. With a bit luck, you can drop good one with PR5 cheaper like $200, just need to know which domain have not fake pr. List of domains are not free, but updated dailly with aprox. 50.000 new expiring domain names.

A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule). The domain name does not immediately go into auction, but is immediately listed on the partnered auction service with an auction scheduled for the near future. Such a domain name will be exclusive to that specific auction service.
Here's an old post on search engine roundtable that claims google's policy is to discount previous backlink juice when a domain changes ownership.  I'm not convinced whether this is actually true or something Google says to discourage excessive domain buying / 301 redirecting for SEO benefit.  The comments above seem to give varying opinions on this matter. Would be great to get to the bottom of that one!
That’s it for deleted domains which you can just pick up by heading over to your favorite registrar and registering it right away as long as it says, free and green here. If it says registered it’s obviously taken. This is obviously a cheap way to get some great links because let’s say, you know, this site we saw is not bad. It doesn’t have page rank, but that could be just because there was no content on the site. If it has a solid link profile, you can be sure that the page rank will come back and you can pick it up for about $10.
Finally, if you were to manually check for drop domains, you have to jump through many hoops. It's a very labor intensive and often confusing process. When you see that a domain name is available, you shouldn’t just stop there. You should also pay attention to how many backlinks it had, how niche-specific the domain is, what kind of websites link to it, did it get signals from social media, and other indicators of quality. If you were to try to look for drop domains manually, it can be a very, very intimidating process. Thankfully, there is an easier solution.
×