If you buy a dropped domain from Snap or Namejet, the backlinks seem to be worthless for SEO.  They are valuable for traffic if it's targeted to your site.  Go ahead and 301 redirect into your site because it's the traffic from the back links that is worth something.  I use the Google URL builder to redirect these names so you can see the domain the traffic is coming from.
If you *really* want to be sure the auction partner is NameJet (because it’s a name you cannot afford to lose in the drop), you can email the technical support team at SRSPLUS and ask them if they follow the same expiration/auction procedures as Network Solutions. Be specific and ask, “Will the domain name, (fill in), expire and be available for auction on NameJet.com as the process is listed at https://www.domainsherpa.com/how-to-grab-an-expiring-domain-name/?”
What you really want to do first is scroll down to where it says, referring pages for anchor phrases. All that is is the anchor text distribution to that site. As you can see here this looks like a very natural link profile. Brand name, a product that they had, no text, URL, shopping cart, wireless government. These are the keywords that were related to what that site was about. Okay?
Today, the story is different. Domain name registrars realized that they could auction expired domain names to the highest bidder and generate additional revenue. If no one wanted the domain names in an auction, the domains would then drop and become available for anyone to register. Much of the time, however, domain names are successfully auctioned.
Domain name market is heavily oversatured these days. There are more than 80 milion domains registered in total. Finding a right domain name is sometimes nearly impossible task, especially if you are not willing to pay extra cash to buy a domain that is already grabed and now for sale. If you have already tried to type in domain names for availability you probably had zero success, especially if you have searched for more generic words and keyphrases. The author of this program remembers he searched virtually for weeks to find some more or less usable names that he could use, and that was years ago. Since then, finding a good domain have gotten harder. Much harder.
Some jerk stole my .com domain name after I had owned it for 10 years and accidentally let it expire, and he’s trying to extort lots of money from me for its return. On the site where it says who owns it, it says “Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited”. What does that mean? The domain expires on September 26. He’ll probably automatically renew it, like he has for the past couple of years. But in case it becomes available, I want to grab it. I’m the only person in the world with my name, and I posted at a blog for 10 years with that domain name. So I’m really upset I don’t have my own name anymore.
I am really new to all this. I am about to launch my blog in the next week. I have a domain and a wordpress blog set ready to go. Clearly it will have no traffic from day one and I guess it will take a while to build up. So my question is would you advise a begginer like me to stick with the one blog for a while and build it up. Or is it worth investing the time early on to master how to find expired domains and link them to the blog?
Now the numbers of errors, for we give up crawling a web site in case you know, they've got some kind of anti scraping technology or the web sites just completely knackered or something thirty is generally fine. Limit number of pages crawled per website most the time you want that ticked. I have it about a hundred thousand less you are going to be crawling some particularly big websites. I like that there, because, if you have an endless, crawl and there's some kind of weird URL structure on a website like an old-school date picker or something you don't want to be endlessly stuck on that website. Show your URLs being crawled. Now, if you just want to see what it's doing, you can have it on for debugging sometimes, but I generally leave it off because it makes it slightly faster and writes results into a text file so as it goes along and it finds expired domains as well as showing you and the GUI here, you can write them into a text file just in case there's a crash or your PC shuts down or something like that.
Yes, we port in all of the domains from NameJet, SnapNames, etc. There are a lot of great deals to be found. Some are absolute trash of course but if you can sift through them and put some time in (hopefully that is what we are trying to do with our tools is save time and give some value add with the SEO metrics, alerts, etc.) then you can find some great bargains.
A brand new domain, for instance, will have to wait for a few days before getting indexed by Google and other search engines, and then its owner will need to go through the tedious process of search engine optimization, which takes time and financial resources. High authority expired domain names on the other hand, offer a short cut and allow you to get down to business straight away.

For many reasons, these domain names expire and become available to the market. Perhaps the domain renewal fees are unpaid. The owner no longer needs the domain or business came to a halt. With the large pool of domain names that become invalid daily, investors who are looking to cash in on the traffic that they generate have to do extra work to find the most profitable every day. The trick is to find expired domains.
Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
i had a backorder for a domian that was registered at godaddy. The backorder of the domain says the domain expires feb 23, 2015. However, when i check the whois on different websites, it now says the domain is registered through feb 2016. However, GODADDY back ordering still has the domain with the expiration date of feb 23, 2015. Why would they be showing 2 different dates? The domain is not even in an auction, so the 2016 seems like the new correct date?
That’s it for deleted domains which you can just pick up by heading over to your favorite registrar and registering it right away as long as it says, free and green here. If it says registered it’s obviously taken. This is obviously a cheap way to get some great links because let’s say, you know, this site we saw is not bad. It doesn’t have page rank, but that could be just because there was no content on the site. If it has a solid link profile, you can be sure that the page rank will come back and you can pick it up for about $10.
This is a little bit on the grey hat/black hat side of the spectrum. But the fact is building a blog network with expired domains flat out works. The only issue is getting those cream of the crop domains without going broke. This video will walk you through tested strategies and techniques you can use to find powerful, yet affordable, expired domains.

2) prerelease auctions.  These are domains where the auction venue has contracted with the registrar, like Fabulous or Moniker, to auction off non-renewed domains.  Just before a domain enters the pending delete process, it goes to a private auction to any person who has backordered the name.  Some people feel that back links on these type of auctions still provide a SEO benifit. My testing indicates that there is zero SEO benifit when these domains are redirected into another site.  So if you get a domain with "pink squirels" in a lot of achor text to a domain and then point it at your domain, you don't rank for "pink squirels"
One of the ways to make the most of this strategy is to sign up for Mobidea. Whatever expired domain you may have, there are high odds that Mobidea would have an offer that’s relevant to your domain’s niche. You simply host your website on the expired domain, place Mobidea’s offers on your website and whenever you make a sale through your website, you receive an affiliate commission!
Your best chance of getting it is contacting the current registrant and negotiating to buy it. After that, your best chance is buying it in auction or finding it listed with a “buy it now” price at a marketplace. Your other option is to find a broker who can negotiate on your behalf (if the domain name sells for a few thousand or higher…brokers likely won’t have the time or inclination to negotiate smaller deals).
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
Referring domains for anchor phrases usually reveals similar information. What you really want to look out for is whether or not the site has been picked up by a spammer in the past. A lot of times these expired domains were dropped, picked up by a website owner who then tried to rank it for keywords like Viagra, Cialis and whatever. You obviously don’t want that kind of domain.
Thanks, Michael. I cannot find the auction site house of this registrar. It IS up for auction, but it’s NOT fully expired nor dropped – so it appears as though using an automated domain name backorder service may not be the best course of action. The URL still renews every year and is not set to expire until June 2016. The registrar is DOMREG LTD and seems to be tied in to LIBRIS.com. Any suggestions? I just need to ensure my $ is going to the actual entity that’ll grant me the URL. I’m unclear how to avoid paying $ for the URL to a company/service that can’t actually do anything for me (i.e., getting ripped off). Thanks for any direction you can offer.
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option. 

However, what do you think about buying expired high PR domains and creating local directories, business reivew, and event calendar sites that actually provide a value to the community? Then include a sponsored link from local business that is trying to rank? Do you think a method like that is a. morally soluble and b. viable long-term because it creates value?
Yes, we port in all of the domains from NameJet, SnapNames, etc. There are a lot of great deals to be found. Some are absolute trash of course but if you can sift through them and put some time in (hopefully that is what we are trying to do with our tools is save time and give some value add with the SEO metrics, alerts, etc.) then you can find some great bargains.

From a most basic perspective, any website or platform on the internet that allows people to post a link which goes to an outside site is a potential source of traffic. However, traffic sources are not created equal. Some traffic sources are very problematic. For example, if you were to go to social media sites and just share content and links, chances are, somebody at some time will object to that practice. They would say you’re spamming. It's very easy to get your affiliate account shut down because people complain. Similarly, you could be blogging for what seems like forever and fail to get much love from search engines.
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