I wish I could tell you that expired domains are some sort of magic bullet solution to all your traffic problems and headaches. Unfortunately, if I were to say that to you, I would be lying. There are drawbacks. Just like with anything else in life, there are advantages and disadvantages. The problems with expired domains is that they are often hard to find on your own. You can take wild guesses and waste a lot of time, effort and energy, and end up with nothing. Also, if you were to try to scope out drop domains by trying to find them in the most common way, which is to use a drop domain exchange, expect to pay a lot of money. Why? Because of heavy competition. Keep in mind that you’re not the only person who knows that dropped domains can bring a lot of traffic to the table. There are many other online marketers out there that realize drop domains' traffic value.
Great post! I tried to repurpose an expired domain to build an authority site (your method 1) – but it doesn’t rank as it should. i checked the backlink profile via majestic and archive.org and it’s clean. also checked the metrics of the competition. with the amount of trust and link juice my expired domain has vs. the competition, it should be on page 1 for those keywords. is there something i’m missing here?
We just need to take the Archive.org url and plug it into the Dom Recovery software and again, if you just hit recover, paste in the snapshot, click next, next, finish, and I’m going to let this one run in real time for you so you can see just how quick it is, and right now it is downloading the initial page, and now it’s downloading all of the other pages.
Referring domains for anchor phrases usually reveals similar information. What you really want to look out for is whether or not the site has been picked up by a spammer in the past. A lot of times these expired domains were dropped, picked up by a website owner who then tried to rank it for keywords like Viagra, Cialis and whatever. You obviously don’t want that kind of domain.
I am trying to find the auction house partnered with “Registration Technologies, Inc.” (http://registrationtek.com/). They appear ancient, but still active. I have attempted to contact them and received no response to my queries. How would I go about finding the auction house they are partnered with? Are you certain that all auctioning partnerships are exclusive?
Warehousing: I have no clue to a percentage of warehoused domains but I know it happens. Tucows even admitted it on my blog “I know you don’t like that we’re allowed to select expiring names for the Tucows Portfolio rather than letting them all go to auction or drop but that seems to be something we have to agree to disagree about.” ~ Ken Schafer (1st comment) http://www.dotweekly.com/could-you-explain-tucows

Answer: Yes. For a vast majority of domain names that expire (greater than 99%+), the rules and processes listed above are valid. However, there appear to be exceptions to these rules. For example, registrars “warehouse” or take for their own domain name portfolios some domain names, and other domain names a renewed even past their expired or redemption periods. In addition, there is at least one registrar that does not have an auction partner, allowing expired domain names to simply drop and be available for hand register.
If it contains any of those, then I am going to crawl it. Otherwise, I'm not going to because it's probably just something like an Amazon listing. Okay lets move on to the endless cruel. So this is the endless crawl. Basically, here you put your seed websites, one will do if it's a big website, because there's probably loads of domains on it. If it's a tiny, tiny a website, then you might want to stick a few more in so, as I was saying before, it will crawl on all the pages on these websites and then for each external domain that it finds on that website. It will check whether it's expired if it's not expired, it'll try and crawl it and then it will start the loop again, it'll try and take all the domains from there check that they are expired.

The results can be different on a daily basis because more and more domain names expire on a regular basis, and some of them are worth real money. All that they have to do is to key in particular keywords that clients regularly search for in their niche and appear on the first page of most search engine results. You can get more that a dozen of expired domain names daily using this fantastic tool.

That’s awesome. For someone that’s willing to “dial for dollars”, I bet there would be a percentage that would convert. It’s a funnel, and the more you put in the top, the more you’ll get out the bottom. 66% success rate sounds high, but I have no data…one would have to try it and see. If anyone is interested, I’d love to interview you after you’ve made the calls and gathered the data!
We just need to take the Archive.org url and plug it into the Dom Recovery software and again, if you just hit recover, paste in the snapshot, click next, next, finish, and I’m going to let this one run in real time for you so you can see just how quick it is, and right now it is downloading the initial page, and now it’s downloading all of the other pages.
By using GoDaddy auctions section, you can also use keywords to search the domain names that you are interested in. For instance, if you type the keyword something like “fitness”, it will list you out all the domain names that matches with the keyword “Fitness” so you can easily make a list of all the domain names with your desired keyword selection.
As mentioned earlier, finding such expired domains can prove to be a daunting task especially if you don’t have a tool to make that process a walk in the park for you. Instead of spending your time searching for tools that you are not even sure will help you find expired domain names with lots of traffic and backlinks, how about you try a game-changing tool integrated into Webfire 3.0 software called Expired Domain Finder and make your expired domain search a lot easier?
Regarding my statement above, “Any domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be auctioned by an auction service.”–it did overstretch. I’ve modified it to be: “A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule).” Then I added a FAQ to clarify. Please check my thinking:
The following TLDs are now fully supported with a deleted list and a droplist (pending delete list). .hn, .ht, .rw, .cr, .gl, .gy, .gs, .om, .qa, .ir, .pe, .com.pe, .tc, .ky, .th, .co.th, .ke, .co.ke, .uz, .kz, .pm, .re, .tf, .wf, .yt, .sx, .gd, .gi, .kg, .mu, .im, .ug, .sb, .tl, .st, .sm, .so, .sn, .pf, .nyc, .cloud, link, .ms, .mk, .af, .bi, .pr, .com.pr, .nf, .nc, .dm, .bo, .ki, .iq, .bj, .am, .as, .ax, .fo, .mg
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