A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule). The domain name does not immediately go into auction, but is immediately listed on the partnered auction service with an auction scheduled for the near future. Such a domain name will be exclusive to that specific auction service.

Let's face it, if you want to make money off the internet, you have to wrap your mind around one central rule: no traffic means no money. Making money online is all about being able to generate traffic from social media sites, search engines, and all other sources of online traffic. It's impossible to make money as an affiliate if you don't have traffic to convert into cold hard dollars. There are, of course, many ways to generate traffic. You can write content and organically attract search engine traffic. You can post a unique blog post on willing third party blogs and enjoy direct traffic along with SEO benefits. You can also promote affiliate links on social media platforms and get traffic that way. In fact, if you really think about it hard enough, generating traffic is really not that difficult.
* “Thousands of domain names that reach expired status never make it to any auction service and are released by the registry.” I think this is only if the registrar a) has an auction partner and b) nobody places a bid at the auction house. In that case, it drops normally and is deleted from the registry and available for anyone to hand register — including backorder services like SnapNames.com or Pool.com. I’m not sure why a registrar wouldn’t list an expiring domain name at the auction house as it could lead to extra revenue for them. Can you, Jamie?

However, Pool uses what some have called a “two-phase” auction system. This means that once you win your original backorder, Pool will then move you into the auction phase where you compete with other bidders for the domain. Pool doesn’t reveal how many bidders there are or what they’re bidding, so you have to offer the highest price you’re willing to if you want to get that dream domain.
The biggest advantage of using expired domain names to earn cash online is that they belonged to a website that had already establish, registered with several search engines companies and has existing backlinks and traffic. In general, by making use of expired domain names you tap into the resources that were created by someone else to get rich within a short time unlike when you do all the dirty work to get your website recognized immediately.
The second option requires a bit more time and effort than a 301 redirect. You could do a mini overhaul of the site and turn it into a microsite for your main domain. This option is good for exact-match domains for your targeted keyword, and there are other reasons for going the microsite route that Rand's highlighted in his post about root domains, subdomains, subfolders and microsites. This strategy also works better if the old domain has decent rankings for the keywords you're targeting.
Since high quality expired domains are in low supply, the huge numbers of marketers competing for those drop domains tend to drive prices up. Also, if you use an exchange, you’re basically lucky to get whatever you can afford. In other words, niche specificity isn't guaranteed. This is going to be a problem because as Google continues to evolve, it is cracking down on domain niche relevance. In other words, its software is fast evolving to the point that it can tell what the niche of a particular domain is. If your private blog network is a patchwork of expired domains that involve many different and dissimilar niches, then you might be in trouble. You are at great risk of being penalized by Google.

Let's face it, if you want to make money off the internet, you have to wrap your mind around one central rule: no traffic means no money. Making money online is all about being able to generate traffic from social media sites, search engines, and all other sources of online traffic. It's impossible to make money as an affiliate if you don't have traffic to convert into cold hard dollars. There are, of course, many ways to generate traffic. You can write content and organically attract search engine traffic. You can post a unique blog post on willing third party blogs and enjoy direct traffic along with SEO benefits. You can also promote affiliate links on social media platforms and get traffic that way. In fact, if you really think about it hard enough, generating traffic is really not that difficult.

I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.

By strategically buying expired domain names which have certain quality features, you can create a link "pump" to your target sites. From an SEO perspective, this can turbo charge your rankings on Google and other search engines. Also, you can make money directly by promoting products on high ranking search results. Additionally, you can make money by selling links on your network to people looking to get an SEO boost.
Sir I am a newbie and a lot interested in doing this business but I don’t know fron where and how to start it. How to purchase where I have to pay and how I have to pay all sort of questions are there in my mind. So sir if you could email me the details then it would be of great help. Its been months searching but I hadn’t purchased any domain yet.
Something similar happend to me in an auction a couple of weeks ago, I won the item, I paid for it, got an email with receipt and all, and then the next day they took it away from me and got the refund.. I know it sucks…… Some auction sites take a lot of time to upgrade their auctions, and this complicate things to, u can win an item in sedo, and still be listed in go daddy or vicceversa, sometimes it takes them days, I once called go daddy and told them, “hey! That domain in auction is mine” , “oh, sorry we haven’t upgraded”..
Answer: Registrars are not set-up to negotiate the selling price of expiring domain names. Their technical support team likely won’t even know what you’re referring to, let alone who to refer your inquiry to. It’s likely your offer won’t even be worth their time to handle. Unless you know the founder, president or chief operating officer of the registrar, you won’t even be able to have a dialogue about it. In addition, depending on how they interpret the ICANN registrar rules, it may not even be possible.
Finding good aged high DA domains with natural links for SEO and filtering them through our expired domain tools is really easy. Contact us with your SEO or PBN needs to receive an offer. If you need domains for a private blog network, 301 redirects or other SEO strategies, then contact us!. Our pool is huge but so many domains are being bought that it’s diminishing at a fast rate.

The better quality links (From Google, Wikipedia) that a website has the higher will be its domain authority. New websites start with a ranking of one, and as the number of links increase the domain authority rises. For example, a sports website that has links to sports newspapers and sports reporting sites will have a higher domain authority than a sports website that only has links to other sports and sports blogging sites.


You can add it as part of a private blog network or you can 301 redirect an expired domain to your site to bring some trust and authority to your site. Now, in my experience, the best place to look for expired domains is this free website called expireddomains.net. So, you just have to head over there, make a free account and this is the page that you’ll see when you log in.
Great article on what to look for when buying expired domains! I’ve looked at the domain and page authority of expired domains but haven’t checked if they are blocked by Google like you’ve listed. I haven’t pulled the trigger yet to purchase one (probably good that I didn’t since I didn’t do all my homework) but this will make it easier to finally go. Thanks for the great info!
Here's an old post on search engine roundtable that claims google's policy is to discount previous backlink juice when a domain changes ownership.  I'm not convinced whether this is actually true or something Google says to discourage excessive domain buying / 301 redirecting for SEO benefit.  The comments above seem to give varying opinions on this matter. Would be great to get to the bottom of that one!

Although I have one query (this answer does answer it, but I have a doubt)… I just bought a domain which had the creation date as 2010 but after acquisition upon checking I found that it has been reset to 2014. So, from what I understand from your article, this could not be undone anyways because this particular domain’s status said as ‘Expired’ and I got it for under $10 from godaddy?

Hi Michael, thanks for the excellent writeup. I followed your steps and found that the domain name I’m seeking is currently registered with GoDaddy. Interestingly enough, I actually owned this domain name almost a decade ago, but out of laziness (at the time), I didn’t renew the registration. Someone else snatched it around the same time and has had it since. The website is dormant, with only an embedded video playlist from a YouTube account last updated over a year ago. The website itself hasn’t changed in appearance for several years.
If the domain name is not with any auction house partner (I think that’s what you’re saying), then you can use a drop catch service anytime: https://www.domainsherpa.com/domain-name-backorder-services/ They do not make your order public information as NameJet and others do by sharing how many bids are placed on a domain name and thereby driving interest.
When a domain name that was previously registered expires, it goes through a grace period that allows the previous registrant one last chance to reclaim their domain before it becomes available to new buyers. If the previous registrant still has not renewed their domain after the 77 day deletion process, the domain name will officially expire and enter the Aftermarket.
"Expired Domains" will help you grab and search through all those domains that are expiring in a organized matter. You will be amazed how many good domains are expiring every day. With Expired Domains you should be able to find a domain you are looking for. It may take some time, and you should not expect to grab something like credit.com. Sometimes you will also need to use a backorder service to assure (as much as possible) that someone who aimed at the same domain as you doesn't grab it before you does.
Here's an old post on search engine roundtable that claims google's policy is to discount previous backlink juice when a domain changes ownership.  I'm not convinced whether this is actually true or something Google says to discourage excessive domain buying / 301 redirecting for SEO benefit.  The comments above seem to give varying opinions on this matter. Would be great to get to the bottom of that one!
Finally, just because you have an idea doesn’t mean that you have more rights to a domain name. That’s not the way the system works. For example, Microsoft owns more than 75,000 domain names. Surely they’re not using them all — but they were acquired through purchasing businesses, hand registering them for business ideas, defensively registering them, etc. And they have the right to do so, just like you do for any idea that they have yet to come up with…just like a real estate investor does for a plot of land they have no intention of building upon for the next decade…just like an art collector does who wraps a Picasso and puts it in their basement.
That’s it for deleted domains which you can just pick up by heading over to your favorite registrar and registering it right away as long as it says, free and green here. If it says registered it’s obviously taken. This is obviously a cheap way to get some great links because let’s say, you know, this site we saw is not bad. It doesn’t have page rank, but that could be just because there was no content on the site. If it has a solid link profile, you can be sure that the page rank will come back and you can pick it up for about $10.
Hey, what’s up everybody. It’s Brian Dean from Quick Sprout. In this video, I’m going to show you how to buy affordable expired domains and how to evaluate the potential value that an expired domain could bring to your site. Now, expired domains is pretty gray hat, black hat type of thing because there’s basically two things you’re going to do in an expired domain.
Now the numbers of errors, for we give up crawling a web site in case you know, they've got some kind of anti scraping technology or the web sites just completely knackered or something thirty is generally fine. Limit number of pages crawled per website most the time you want that ticked. I have it about a hundred thousand less you are going to be crawling some particularly big websites. I like that there, because, if you have an endless, crawl and there's some kind of weird URL structure on a website like an old-school date picker or something you don't want to be endlessly stuck on that website. Show your URLs being crawled. Now, if you just want to see what it's doing, you can have it on for debugging sometimes, but I generally leave it off because it makes it slightly faster and writes results into a text file so as it goes along and it finds expired domains as well as showing you and the GUI here, you can write them into a text file just in case there's a crash or your PC shuts down or something like that.
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Hey , Nice Article . Just have one query . I read your article and the issue is I want to buy one expired domain which is too good but how can I fill the reconsideration request as the domain is banned . I have not purchased the domain yet because I want to purchase it when the domain gets unbanned . So if you check Google.com/webmasters/tools/reconsideration – Requesting reconsideration of: which is only showing the websites I have in the account .. So how can I add the domain name there . OR first of all I have to buy the domain add in GWT and then send reconsideration request . If that is so then I guess you should have mentioned in the article I suppose ? Let me know thanks
Although I have one query (this answer does answer it, but I have a doubt)… I just bought a domain which had the creation date as 2010 but after acquisition upon checking I found that it has been reset to 2014. So, from what I understand from your article, this could not be undone anyways because this particular domain’s status said as ‘Expired’ and I got it for under $10 from godaddy?
See https://www.domainsherpa.com/domain-name-dictionary/life-cycle-of-a-typical-gtld-domain-name/. They start it in auction listings after it expires and before pending delete. I don’t know the exact dates, but if you monitor it you’ll see it go from auction, to closeout, to drop. You’ll need an auctions.godaddy.com account (I believe $5 per year) to bid and buy.
There is a secondary registrar check built-in, so shouldn't happen very often, so that's the amount external domains we found. Then out of those how many of them are expired domains we've found which will appear in here or in any of the other ones, depending on which type of crawl were running, and that's just simply how long this crewel has been running. So we've got a lot of the similar settings here, in the search query crawl. We have how many queries have been blocked, which you shouldn't get many with any blocked because you're, not hammering google, you know you're sending one query and then processing the results and then sending another query see not scraping Google all all at once. So that's how many queries we've done and how many we've got left to process.

See https://www.domainsherpa.com/domain-name-dictionary/life-cycle-of-a-typical-gtld-domain-name/. They start it in auction listings after it expires and before pending delete. I don’t know the exact dates, but if you monitor it you’ll see it go from auction, to closeout, to drop. You’ll need an auctions.godaddy.com account (I believe $5 per year) to bid and buy.


Now, a lot of times these great domains that have pending delete will get snapped up in a flash. Okay? You want to use the same system that’s 500,000 domains so you can always sort them by whatever you want to do to make sure you’re only looking at quality domains and look at the link profile the same way. Once you find one that you like, you can’t just sit on your computer at Go Daddy and wait for it drop on 6/14 and expect to get it because there’s going to be a lot of other people gunning for that domain. You actually have to use a service like Snap Name.
Okay. So, let's move on to our next tab crawl from search query, something look at the settings. So if you want to limit the amount of results that you cruel per search query, you can tick that and specify, so if you only want to crawl the top three or ten results from each search query, you can enter that there. He'll just go to the end of the search. Next setting, results on Google skip the domain if it's in the majestic million, so the majestic million is just something from majestic, it's a free resource that majestic SEO makes available that shows the most popular hundred domains.
Your best chance of getting it is contacting the current registrant and negotiating to buy it. After that, your best chance is buying it in auction or finding it listed with a “buy it now” price at a marketplace. Your other option is to find a broker who can negotiate on your behalf (if the domain name sells for a few thousand or higher…brokers likely won’t have the time or inclination to negotiate smaller deals).
By using GoDaddy auctions section, you can also use keywords to search the domain names that you are interested in. For instance, if you type the keyword something like “fitness”, it will list you out all the domain names that matches with the keyword “Fitness” so you can easily make a list of all the domain names with your desired keyword selection.
Great post! I tried to repurpose an expired domain to build an authority site (your method 1) – but it doesn’t rank as it should. i checked the backlink profile via majestic and archive.org and it’s clean. also checked the metrics of the competition. with the amount of trust and link juice my expired domain has vs. the competition, it should be on page 1 for those keywords. is there something i’m missing here?
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