Once you get to this point you know there have been DMAS listed. They have a number of domains linking to them and according to the way back machine which is WBY, you can see their site age. So, if you want to go with an older site you can see right here whether or not this is a site that you might be interested in, but before pulling the trigger you do want to check two things.
This wonderful piece of information about buying expired domains is simply mind-blowing and I did not know about that before. It is easy for every one to understand about the topic with the pictorial representation. I feel sad that you lost around $400 due to Fake PR, but this article will surely help others save them from any sort of inconvenience.
Domain Hunter Gatherer is a specialized software that helps internet marketers to easily find expired domains quickly and efficiently. First, you can use it to crawl multiple domain auction sites. You can easily monitor many different domain exchanges so you can scoop up the latest and greatest dropped domains. Secondly, you can use Domain Hunter Gatherer to crawl Web 2.0 sites. Now, you may be thinking, “I'm looking for drop domains here, what do Web 2.0 sites have to do with my search?” Well, you would be overlooking one of the best ways to add value to your private blog network. While you don't legally own your Web 2.0 site, you can use your accounts to redirect the links to your target sites. The best part is that many people who build up nice looking and high goodwill Web 2.0 pages end up abandoning them. Many Web 2.0 platforms enable people to re-register or claim abandoned Web 2.0 accounts. By using Domain Hunter Gatherer, you can find these accounts and filter them by niche as well as quality indicators and then redirect their links to your target sites. Your private blog network goes up in value because of a more diverse backlink footprint.
The second option requires a bit more time and effort than a 301 redirect. You could do a mini overhaul of the site and turn it into a microsite for your main domain. This option is good for exact-match domains for your targeted keyword, and there are other reasons for going the microsite route that Rand's highlighted in his post about root domains, subdomains, subfolders and microsites. This strategy also works better if the old domain has decent rankings for the keywords you're targeting.
By using GoDaddy auctions section, you can also use keywords to search the domain names that you are interested in. For instance, if you type the keyword something like “fitness”, it will list you out all the domain names that matches with the keyword “Fitness” so you can easily make a list of all the domain names with your desired keyword selection.
And then you hit on ‘search’ and ‘all auctions’ and this is going to go out to lots of different auction sites, in fact I’m just going to stop this search, and it’s going to go out to all of these domain auction sites, find a list of domains that are relevant to your keywords and then pull back all of the data that you need to make a good buying decision.

However, Pool uses what some have called a “two-phase” auction system. This means that once you win your original backorder, Pool will then move you into the auction phase where you compete with other bidders for the domain. Pool doesn’t reveal how many bidders there are or what they’re bidding, so you have to offer the highest price you’re willing to if you want to get that dream domain.


Trust flow refers to the number of quality backlinks that a website has. If backlinks from websites that have a high domain and authority ranking point to your site; your website’s trust flow will increase. Trust flow is also measured on a scale of 1 to 100. If your website has a large number of backlinks, but they are not from trustworthy and reliable domains, your websites trust flow will be low. On the other hand, if you even have just a handful of backlinks to sites that search engines rank highly; your trust flow will increase.
We are a LauncHUB funded Startup that focuses on big data research of domain names and Whois information. SEO experts can use our unique system for finding expired domains with authority and backlinks. Investigators can use the same database to find information for domain owners and hosts with Reverse Whois and Reverse IP tools. We can also offer brands trademark monitoring in the vast pool of ccTLD domain names.

Domain Hunter Gatherer also makes expired domain detection less painful. As I've mentioned above, finding drop domains on your own can be like taking shots in the dark, or trying to find a needle in a haystack. You’re more than welcome to try it, but I’m telling you, it’s not going to be a pleasant experience. With Domain Hunter Gatherer, you have many different options on how to search for drop domains. You can enter a search term and it will spit out sites that you can then crawl for dead links. You can then filter these dead links to see if they can be registered. You can also enter a site URL of a competitor and get dead links that way. You can even import web pages from Wikipedia or other websites to scan for dead links.
The second option requires a bit more time and effort than a 301 redirect. You could do a mini overhaul of the site and turn it into a microsite for your main domain. This option is good for exact-match domains for your targeted keyword, and there are other reasons for going the microsite route that Rand's highlighted in his post about root domains, subdomains, subfolders and microsites. This strategy also works better if the old domain has decent rankings for the keywords you're targeting.
Hi Michael, thanks for the excellent writeup. I followed your steps and found that the domain name I’m seeking is currently registered with GoDaddy. Interestingly enough, I actually owned this domain name almost a decade ago, but out of laziness (at the time), I didn’t renew the registration. Someone else snatched it around the same time and has had it since. The website is dormant, with only an embedded video playlist from a YouTube account last updated over a year ago. The website itself hasn’t changed in appearance for several years.

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Thanks, Michael. I cannot find the auction site house of this registrar. It IS up for auction, but it’s NOT fully expired nor dropped – so it appears as though using an automated domain name backorder service may not be the best course of action. The URL still renews every year and is not set to expire until June 2016. The registrar is DOMREG LTD and seems to be tied in to LIBRIS.com. Any suggestions? I just need to ensure my $ is going to the actual entity that’ll grant me the URL. I’m unclear how to avoid paying $ for the URL to a company/service that can’t actually do anything for me (i.e., getting ripped off). Thanks for any direction you can offer.
The whitelist filter for wanted characters is now split into three filters. The old whitelist is now named whitelist (only). When used, the domain has to consist only of the defined characters or numbers. No other characters are allowed. The new whitelist (any) filter finds domains that have at least one of the defined characters or numbers. The new whitelist (all) filter finds domains that have all defined characters or numbers at least once.
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