Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).

Much obliged Michael. Extremely supportive data. I have been reached by their specialists and need to pitch it to me for $3500. It just stays there and is not a high esteemed area name. Simply my name. I needed it for quite a long time, however not willing to fork out that sort of cash. Was truly trusting I could catch it consistently when it lapses.


I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?

So, what to do? Simply, you must use someones other hard work and thinking. People have already contemplated all possible variations, synonyms, they know how domain names are valued, know about keywords, type-in traffic etc. Every day tens of thousands domains names are expiring. Every single day. That is hell of a lot expired domains to pick from. The reasons why people "let" domains expire are various. Could be somethins as banal as forgeting to renew, could be as serious as physical death. Many let domains expire because they don't need them any more. But that is not your bussiness to think about.
Domain name search results appear as you type. We can do domain lookups very quickly, and usually show domain search results in less than 100 milliseconds. We generate domain names and check .com and many other domain extensions instantly. We use artificial intelligence techniques to find domains for sale that you can buy today and expired domains to backorder. Just start typing!

So, what I like to do is also choose DMAS listed entry. No fake or no unsure page rank. Click the apply filter button and this will show us a much better group of websites, including a lot of high page rank websites. That’s one great thing about Go Daddy Auctions that you don’t have to guess about what the rank will be which is not the case with a lot of deleted domains which, because they were deindexed they didn’t have any content, they didn’t have any hosting, they don’t have any page rank. So, you have to make an estimation.
When the domain drops, the minute it drops, literally, they will try to get it and if you can get it, it’s yours. So, that’s it for expired domains. You can see it’s a little bit complicated and it takes some leg work, but if you’re interested in building a publisher network or a private blog network, this is a great way to find sites that have a great link profile without you having to actually build any links. So, that’s it for this video. I’ll see you in the next one.
I wish I could tell you that expired domains are some sort of magic bullet solution to all your traffic problems and headaches. Unfortunately, if I were to say that to you, I would be lying. There are drawbacks. Just like with anything else in life, there are advantages and disadvantages. The problems with expired domains is that they are often hard to find on your own. You can take wild guesses and waste a lot of time, effort and energy, and end up with nothing. Also, if you were to try to scope out drop domains by trying to find them in the most common way, which is to use a drop domain exchange, expect to pay a lot of money. Why? Because of heavy competition. Keep in mind that you’re not the only person who knows that dropped domains can bring a lot of traffic to the table. There are many other online marketers out there that realize drop domains' traffic value.
At the end of the day, this article is geared to startups, business entrepreneurs, webmasters and marketing professionals who need to understand the process, and I guestimate that the process listed in the article above accounts for 99%+ of all expired domain names. All of your points are valid and appreciated, but if someone is interested in buying a good, brandable domain name for their business, they should follow the instructions above to have the best chance of grabbing it.
Lets look at some settiings, so you could enter a list of websites to crawl for expired domains on, or you can enter a search query say you're looking to form a pbn to boost your money site, that's about horse riding or something you could put horse riding down there and then it'll search, Google for horse riding and then crawl all the domains that Google brings back to you. Then we've got endless crawl and you basically you put in a few seed websites and then it will just crawl endlessly from those websites. So it will take all the domains off those websites. First they'll check whether they're expired or not. If they're not expired, then it'll start crawling them and then it will crawl the ones it finds from them and so on so on and so on. It will just keep going ok.
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
As you can see just within expired domains they have over two million deleted .com domains. Now, this is obviously overwhelming if you’re trying to look for domains. So, you should use a few filters to make the search process a lot easier. To do that, click on the search filter button. Down here I like to click on the Only With A DMAS Entry because that just filters out sites that are really spammy. For sites that that have been in DMAS ever, it means that the site had to be of some quality.
The third option is the one that's the most time consuming but also has its benefits. It's like having a successful restaurant and buying another restaurant and operating them simultaneously. They're not the exact same restaurant, but both are popular in their own right and make you money. The same goes for Option #3. You could update the content on the old domain and sell the same products that you're selling on your current site. If you can get both sites to rank alongside each other in the SERPs, you're increasing your conversion chances and sales potential.

For many reasons, these domain names expire and become available to the market. Perhaps the domain renewal fees are unpaid. The owner no longer needs the domain or business came to a halt. With the large pool of domain names that become invalid daily, investors who are looking to cash in on the traffic that they generate have to do extra work to find the most profitable every day. The trick is to find expired domains.
However, what do you think about buying expired high PR domains and creating local directories, business reivew, and event calendar sites that actually provide a value to the community? Then include a sponsored link from local business that is trying to rank? Do you think a method like that is a. morally soluble and b. viable long-term because it creates value?
Finally, you want to head over to domaintools.com. Then put the domain into here. What this will do is it’ll show you the history of the domain, because a lot of times these domains have been dropped like four or five times and a lot of people in SEO feel this way. I’m not sure about it. If a domain has been dropped several times, then Google does actually devalue the links pointing to that domain. So, as you can see I just changed registrars a few times and it hasn’t been dropped or else it’ll say one drops or two drops.

Okay. So, let's move on to our next tab crawl from search query, something look at the settings. So if you want to limit the amount of results that you cruel per search query, you can tick that and specify, so if you only want to crawl the top three or ten results from each search query, you can enter that there. He'll just go to the end of the search. Next setting, results on Google skip the domain if it's in the majestic million, so the majestic million is just something from majestic, it's a free resource that majestic SEO makes available that shows the most popular hundred domains.


I want to purchase a domain name that is to expire very soon. After looking it up on Whois, the owner is revealed to be 1 and 1, which doesn’t have a designated auction house based on your chart above. How should I go about trying to buy this? Because I don’t know if it will go to auction, and if it does, which auction house I should look at. It is set to expire soon: 2015-09-21
What I like to do is sort by DP which stands for domain pop, and this is basically the number of linking root domains. So, BL is the number of back links. As you know that can be somewhat misleading if they have a lot of site wide links or multiple links from the same domain. I like to sort by domain pop. What that does is it brings up the sites with the most amount of referring domains.
There is no easy way to explain “all” things about expired domain names. As you stated Michael, Network Solutions domain names go to the partnered domain auction service NameJet.com BUT, not “all” do… NSI customers have the option to opt-out of having expired domains go to auction. If a customer picks this option, the domain name would go through the drop process and go PendingDelete around the 71st day after the expire date. When it is released from the registry, the domain name is fair game to the major dropcatching services and the private ones. This still doesn’t mean anybody would grab it, and the domain may become available to hand register.
Then the number is an HRL so it’ll be quite a bit different then you’ll see an expired domains because domain pop service is not very good compared to HREFs. Usually this shows about 20 percent of the total lengths. This shows more like 80. Okay? As you can see it has actually 162 referring domains which is quite a lot better than we saw in expired domains.
That’s awesome. For someone that’s willing to “dial for dollars”, I bet there would be a percentage that would convert. It’s a funnel, and the more you put in the top, the more you’ll get out the bottom. 66% success rate sounds high, but I have no data…one would have to try it and see. If anyone is interested, I’d love to interview you after you’ve made the calls and gathered the data!

GoDaddy Auctions is a marketplace where GoDaddy lists domains that have expired and are in the renewal grace period. Apart from these GoDaddy also lists other domains, but the expiring auctions at GoDaddy are the most popular. Based on the percieved value of the domain, domainers and SEOs bid on these auctions. If the original owner does not renew the domain, the top bid wins the auction and gets the domain name.
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