Sometimes people purchase domains that they plan to build a website on or sell in the future, but it just doesn’t end up happening. If an individual decides that it is no longer worth the yearly investment of keeping the domain in their account, they may choose to let it expire. Or, someone might just forget to renew the domain before the expiration date. If this happens, it’s a great chance for other domain investors to score rare domain names that are pending delete. Spending time perusing the list of recently dropped domains can be a worthwhile way to find high quality domains.
I registered for backordering with GoDaddy last year, as i saw goddady was the registar of the domain i wanted. However when the deadline for renewal came, i got a message the expiration date had changed to expire… well, a year later, i.e. now in 4 days. How can the expiration date be postponed? Was that the registrant renewed? does that mean the domain never becomes available and never goes to auction?

While traffic, as an abstract, is fairly easy to understand and get, getting it on a consistent basis is another matter entirely. That’s why a lot of affiliate marketers who are serious about generating online traffic are quickly paying attention to drop domains. Drop domains is not a new phenomenon. People have been registering drop domains for many years now to scoop up traffic that those domains still attract. However, as Google continues to crack down, and as more social media platforms impose anti marketing rules, or rules that have an anti marketing effect, drop domains have become more prominent in the online marketing landscape. If you would like to tap into a fairly easy and potentially powerful source of online traffic, consider drop domains.


Much obliged Michael. Extremely supportive data. I have been reached by their specialists and need to pitch it to me for $3500. It just stays there and is not a high esteemed area name. Simply my name. I needed it for quite a long time, however not willing to fork out that sort of cash. Was truly trusting I could catch it consistently when it lapses.
But unless the domain name you want is undesirable to anyone else (e.g., it does not include real words or have a high search volume for the words), the odds are not in your favor. With over 210 million domain names registered and an active, worldwide domain name investing community, it is highly likely that someone else will also find interest in the domain name you are watching. As such, skip to Step 4.
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If your domain name was in fact stolen from you, please go file a police report as soon as possible. If, instead, you allowed your domain name to expire through carelessness or ignorance, then you’ve learned a valuable lesson: domains have value. I’m not saying this to be a jerk, I’m saying this because words matter and saying something was “stolen” when in fact it was allowed to expire is not truth. I’m happy to share my knowledge as clearly as possible for others to benefit from, and all I ask is that others do the same.


Expired domains with page rank, Alexa, TF, CF, Backlinks, DA, PA, RD, etc. are of much importance. It is because search engine values those expired domains because of their pre-built matrices. It can take you months to build that trust and then it will be of the value that you want. So, what if you can find expired domains with authority links like expired domains with CNN links, expired domains with Wikipedia links, expired domains with Huffington post links, etc. This kind of expired domains will provide you some great juice for your money website.

Warehousing: I have no clue to a percentage of warehoused domains but I know it happens. Tucows even admitted it on my blog “I know you don’t like that we’re allowed to select expiring names for the Tucows Portfolio rather than letting them all go to auction or drop but that seems to be something we have to agree to disagree about.” ~ Ken Schafer (1st comment) http://www.dotweekly.com/could-you-explain-tucows


I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?
Page authority ranking criteria are similar to domain authority. It’s ranked on a scale of 1 to 100. Page Authority measures the predictive ranking of a web page. The page authority of a website can change depending on various metrics. Search engines examine the relevance and authority of a page based on its contents and external links. If a webpage has links to higher authority sites and has keywords in it, its authority ranking will increase.
At the end of the day, this article is geared to startups, business entrepreneurs, webmasters and marketing professionals who need to understand the process, and I guestimate that the process listed in the article above accounts for 99%+ of all expired domain names. All of your points are valid and appreciated, but if someone is interested in buying a good, brandable domain name for their business, they should follow the instructions above to have the best chance of grabbing it.
Surely if you purchase a domain (domain1.com) and redirect it to your existing domain (domain2.com) you expect to loose all ranking for domain1.com. If 301's are used then the objective is simply to pass on authority, not dominate the search results with 2 domains. If you want to keep domain2.com in the index then you would take Rebecca's option 2 or 3.

2) prerelease auctions.  These are domains where the auction venue has contracted with the registrar, like Fabulous or Moniker, to auction off non-renewed domains.  Just before a domain enters the pending delete process, it goes to a private auction to any person who has backordered the name.  Some people feel that back links on these type of auctions still provide a SEO benifit. My testing indicates that there is zero SEO benifit when these domains are redirected into another site.  So if you get a domain with "pink squirels" in a lot of achor text to a domain and then point it at your domain, you don't rank for "pink squirels"
We just need to take the Archive.org url and plug it into the Dom Recovery software and again, if you just hit recover, paste in the snapshot, click next, next, finish, and I’m going to let this one run in real time for you so you can see just how quick it is, and right now it is downloading the initial page, and now it’s downloading all of the other pages.
Finally, you want to head over to domaintools.com. Then put the domain into here. What this will do is it’ll show you the history of the domain, because a lot of times these domains have been dropped like four or five times and a lot of people in SEO feel this way. I’m not sure about it. If a domain has been dropped several times, then Google does actually devalue the links pointing to that domain. So, as you can see I just changed registrars a few times and it hasn’t been dropped or else it’ll say one drops or two drops.

There is a secondary registrar check built-in, so shouldn't happen very often, so that's the amount external domains we found. Then out of those how many of them are expired domains we've found which will appear in here or in any of the other ones, depending on which type of crawl were running, and that's just simply how long this crewel has been running. So we've got a lot of the similar settings here, in the search query crawl. We have how many queries have been blocked, which you shouldn't get many with any blocked because you're, not hammering google, you know you're sending one query and then processing the results and then sending another query see not scraping Google all all at once. So that's how many queries we've done and how many we've got left to process.


This is a little bit on the grey hat/black hat side of the spectrum. But the fact is building a blog network with expired domains flat out works. The only issue is getting those cream of the crop domains without going broke. This video will walk you through tested strategies and techniques you can use to find powerful, yet affordable, expired domains.
Also note the Expired Domain Plugin is a lifetime “per user” license, so if you have multiple ScrapeBox licenses registered to the one email address purchasing the Expired Domain once will activate the plugin for all your ScrapeBox licenses with the same email for life. The plugin is a one-time payment and is not a monthly or yearly subscription, all updates are free.
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