Most popular auctions with expiring domains are at godaddy, namejet, snapnames. Search for expired domains name its very easy if you have domains list. With a bit luck, you can drop good one with PR5 cheaper like $200, just need to know which domain have not fake pr. List of domains are not free, but updated dailly with aprox. 50.000 new expiring domain names.

Now the numbers of errors, for we give up crawling a web site in case you know, they've got some kind of anti scraping technology or the web sites just completely knackered or something thirty is generally fine. Limit number of pages crawled per website most the time you want that ticked. I have it about a hundred thousand less you are going to be crawling some particularly big websites. I like that there, because, if you have an endless, crawl and there's some kind of weird URL structure on a website like an old-school date picker or something you don't want to be endlessly stuck on that website. Show your URLs being crawled. Now, if you just want to see what it's doing, you can have it on for debugging sometimes, but I generally leave it off because it makes it slightly faster and writes results into a text file so as it goes along and it finds expired domains as well as showing you and the GUI here, you can write them into a text file just in case there's a crash or your PC shuts down or something like that.
For example, placing your backorder at NameJet will reveal your interest to other potential buyers so if no other backorders are present you should wait until the last possible moment before the deadline to place your backorder — because if you’re the only backorder, you’ll get it for the minimum $39 bid on expiring names and it won’t go to auction.
Ultimately, I was left with a semi-automated process of scraping sites and running an intricate series of processes to come up with a list of expired domains that I then had to evaluate by hand. This meant I had Majestic and Moz open to check the backlink anchor text and Archive.org to check for obvious spam for every single possible domain. The process was excruciatingly slow and tedious, but absolutely necessary to find domains that would be suitable for building out.
There is no easy way to explain “all” things about expired domain names. As you stated Michael, Network Solutions domain names go to the partnered domain auction service NameJet.com BUT, not “all” do… NSI customers have the option to opt-out of having expired domains go to auction. If a customer picks this option, the domain name would go through the drop process and go PendingDelete around the 71st day after the expire date. When it is released from the registry, the domain name is fair game to the major dropcatching services and the private ones. This still doesn’t mean anybody would grab it, and the domain may become available to hand register.
Finally, you want to head over to domaintools.com. Then put the domain into here. What this will do is it’ll show you the history of the domain, because a lot of times these domains have been dropped like four or five times and a lot of people in SEO feel this way. I’m not sure about it. If a domain has been dropped several times, then Google does actually devalue the links pointing to that domain. So, as you can see I just changed registrars a few times and it hasn’t been dropped or else it’ll say one drops or two drops.
We are a LauncHUB funded Startup that focuses on big data research of domain names and Whois information. SEO experts can use our unique system for finding expired domains with authority and backlinks. Investigators can use the same database to find information for domain owners and hosts with Reverse Whois and Reverse IP tools. We can also offer brands trademark monitoring in the vast pool of ccTLD domain names.

Page authority ranking criteria are similar to domain authority. It’s ranked on a scale of 1 to 100. Page Authority measures the predictive ranking of a web page. The page authority of a website can change depending on various metrics. Search engines examine the relevance and authority of a page based on its contents and external links. If a webpage has links to higher authority sites and has keywords in it, its authority ranking will increase.


Finally, just because you have an idea doesn’t mean that you have more rights to a domain name. That’s not the way the system works. For example, Microsoft owns more than 75,000 domain names. Surely they’re not using them all — but they were acquired through purchasing businesses, hand registering them for business ideas, defensively registering them, etc. And they have the right to do so, just like you do for any idea that they have yet to come up with…just like a real estate investor does for a plot of land they have no intention of building upon for the next decade…just like an art collector does who wraps a Picasso and puts it in their basement.
I want to purchase a domain name that is to expire very soon. After looking it up on Whois, the owner is revealed to be 1 and 1, which doesn’t have a designated auction house based on your chart above. How should I go about trying to buy this? Because I don’t know if it will go to auction, and if it does, which auction house I should look at. It is set to expire soon: 2015-09-21
Much obliged Michael. Extremely supportive data. I have been reached by their specialists and need to pitch it to me for $3500. It just stays there and is not a high esteemed area name. Simply my name. I needed it for quite a long time, however not willing to fork out that sort of cash. Was truly trusting I could catch it consistently when it lapses.
If you buy a dropped domain from Snap or Namejet, the backlinks seem to be worthless for SEO.  They are valuable for traffic if it's targeted to your site.  Go ahead and 301 redirect into your site because it's the traffic from the back links that is worth something.  I use the Google URL builder to redirect these names so you can see the domain the traffic is coming from.

If it contains any of those, then I am going to crawl it. Otherwise, I'm not going to because it's probably just something like an Amazon listing. Okay lets move on to the endless cruel. So this is the endless crawl. Basically, here you put your seed websites, one will do if it's a big website, because there's probably loads of domains on it. If it's a tiny, tiny a website, then you might want to stick a few more in so, as I was saying before, it will crawl on all the pages on these websites and then for each external domain that it finds on that website. It will check whether it's expired if it's not expired, it'll try and crawl it and then it will start the loop again, it'll try and take all the domains from there check that they are expired.

That’s it for deleted domains which you can just pick up by heading over to your favorite registrar and registering it right away as long as it says, free and green here. If it says registered it’s obviously taken. This is obviously a cheap way to get some great links because let’s say, you know, this site we saw is not bad. It doesn’t have page rank, but that could be just because there was no content on the site. If it has a solid link profile, you can be sure that the page rank will come back and you can pick it up for about $10.


I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?
1. Some domain names don’t go to auction and are instead held by the registrar in their own portfolios (you called this “warehousing” by the registrar). This is probably less than 0.001% of the domain names….actually, probably even less. I suspect it would only be premium domain names with massive exact match local search quantities. Not surprisingly, I cannot find any information from registrars about their procedure, quantities of domains their keep, or ICANN’s rules (if any) about this.

Finally, if you were to manually check for drop domains, you have to jump through many hoops. It's a very labor intensive and often confusing process. When you see that a domain name is available, you shouldn’t just stop there. You should also pay attention to how many backlinks it had, how niche-specific the domain is, what kind of websites link to it, did it get signals from social media, and other indicators of quality. If you were to try to look for drop domains manually, it can be a very, very intimidating process. Thankfully, there is an easier solution.


No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
"Expired Domains" will help you grab and search through all those domains that are expiring in a organized matter. You will be amazed how many good domains are expiring every day. With Expired Domains you should be able to find a domain you are looking for. It may take some time, and you should not expect to grab something like credit.com. Sometimes you will also need to use a backorder service to assure (as much as possible) that someone who aimed at the same domain as you doesn't grab it before you does.
i had a backorder for a domian that was registered at godaddy. The backorder of the domain says the domain expires feb 23, 2015. However, when i check the whois on different websites, it now says the domain is registered through feb 2016. However, GODADDY back ordering still has the domain with the expiration date of feb 23, 2015. Why would they be showing 2 different dates? The domain is not even in an auction, so the 2016 seems like the new correct date?
* “Thousands of domain names that reach expired status never make it to any auction service and are released by the registry.” I think this is only if the registrar a) has an auction partner and b) nobody places a bid at the auction house. In that case, it drops normally and is deleted from the registry and available for anyone to hand register — including backorder services like SnapNames.com or Pool.com. I’m not sure why a registrar wouldn’t list an expiring domain name at the auction house as it could lead to extra revenue for them. Can you, Jamie?
From a most basic perspective, any website or platform on the internet that allows people to post a link which goes to an outside site is a potential source of traffic. However, traffic sources are not created equal. Some traffic sources are very problematic. For example, if you were to go to social media sites and just share content and links, chances are, somebody at some time will object to that practice. They would say you’re spamming. It's very easy to get your affiliate account shut down because people complain. Similarly, you could be blogging for what seems like forever and fail to get much love from search engines.
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