At the end of the day, this article is geared to startups, business entrepreneurs, webmasters and marketing professionals who need to understand the process, and I guestimate that the process listed in the article above accounts for 99%+ of all expired domain names. All of your points are valid and appreciated, but if someone is interested in buying a good, brandable domain name for their business, they should follow the instructions above to have the best chance of grabbing it.
I'm running the new Mac edition of Domain Ronin and I have to tell you it's extremely stable. I'm getting about 250k pages every 5 minutes which equates to about 2700 checked domains. At the moment it's only using about 1 gig of memory for 100 threads. I've got the page count and other settings to the max. The builtin features like TF and spam checking on the fly are wicked helpful.
SEO is not as easy as it used to be. The market is very saturated now, content is now incredibly easy to generate and publish. Everyone and his dog (or gran!) can make a wordpress website. The main ranking factor for Google is still backlinks and will be for the foreseeable future. Your content might be better than your competitors but if they have more links they'll simply always outrank you and receive more traffic. Fair or not, its a fact. This method can see you get the strong backlink profile you need to rank #1. Please note a PBN is considered black hat so please diversify your backlink profile and do your research first.
When searching from keyword DHG will take your list of keywords and search each one, the pages will then be crawled to find unique domains to check availability of. The process is relatively simple but very time consuming when done manually or semi automated as was necessary in the past. Luckily now the job can be set and left to work while you do something else.
Hey , Nice Article . Just have one query . I read your article and the issue is I want to buy one expired domain which is too good but how can I fill the reconsideration request as the domain is banned . I have not purchased the domain yet because I want to purchase it when the domain gets unbanned . So if you check Google.com/webmasters/tools/reconsideration – Requesting reconsideration of: which is only showing the websites I have in the account .. So how can I add the domain name there . OR first of all I have to buy the domain add in GWT and then send reconsideration request . If that is so then I guess you should have mentioned in the article I suppose ? Let me know thanks
So, let's start off with the simple website list crawl. So settings for this is covered by the general crawl settings and these apply to all the other types of crawl as well, such as the Search crawl and the Endless cruel, so pretty simple really. Delay between each request to a website. One second, this is in seconds. Secondly, concurrent websites crawl how many websites you want to crawl at any one point in time and then how many threads will concurrently crawl per website. So that's ten, a crawl of ten websites at once, and each of those websites there's three different threads crawling. That's 30 concurrent connections you've got going.
And then you hit on ‘search’ and ‘all auctions’ and this is going to go out to lots of different auction sites, in fact I’m just going to stop this search, and it’s going to go out to all of these domain auction sites, find a list of domains that are relevant to your keywords and then pull back all of the data that you need to make a good buying decision.
This wonderful piece of information about buying expired domains is simply mind-blowing and I did not know about that before. It is easy for every one to understand about the topic with the pictorial representation. I feel sad that you lost around $400 due to Fake PR, but this article will surely help others save them from any sort of inconvenience.
Of course, this does not happen equally across the board. Some site owners are lazy and barely put in any effort. As you can probably tell, the four situations I outlined above probably will not occur for website owners who are lazy. Now, for website owners who put in the work and the time for their online properties, you can bet that they would get to benefit from the four situations outlined above.
I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.

Regarding my statement above, “Any domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be auctioned by an auction service.”–it did overstretch. I’ve modified it to be: “A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule).” Then I added a FAQ to clarify. Please check my thinking:
2) prerelease auctions.  These are domains where the auction venue has contracted with the registrar, like Fabulous or Moniker, to auction off non-renewed domains.  Just before a domain enters the pending delete process, it goes to a private auction to any person who has backordered the name.  Some people feel that back links on these type of auctions still provide a SEO benifit. My testing indicates that there is zero SEO benifit when these domains are redirected into another site.  So if you get a domain with "pink squirels" in a lot of achor text to a domain and then point it at your domain, you don't rank for "pink squirels"
Surely if you purchase a domain (domain1.com) and redirect it to your existing domain (domain2.com) you expect to loose all ranking for domain1.com. If 301's are used then the objective is simply to pass on authority, not dominate the search results with 2 domains. If you want to keep domain2.com in the index then you would take Rebecca's option 2 or 3.

Regarding my statement above, “Any domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be auctioned by an auction service.”–it did overstretch. I’ve modified it to be: “A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule).” Then I added a FAQ to clarify. Please check my thinking:


Of course, this does not happen equally across the board. Some site owners are lazy and barely put in any effort. As you can probably tell, the four situations I outlined above probably will not occur for website owners who are lazy. Now, for website owners who put in the work and the time for their online properties, you can bet that they would get to benefit from the four situations outlined above.

Thank you for a very informative article. I am still a bit confused on a couple of things. There is a domain that I have been looking to purchase for about a year now and it expires within the next 24 hours. It is with name.com and appears for backorder at snapnames but not at namejet. I am assuming this is because they are both connected auction houses?


The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
I had two domains, a .com and .net with godaddy. I’m beyond their redemption period ($80 fee), but they said it should be released back to the public domain soon and I may be able to get it back. Before I knew this, I paid $12.99 plus ican fees for the .com thinking it was available as the rep told me she was able to add it their cart, and I paid a $24.95 fee for back ordering my .net domain. Shortly thereafter, I received an email from godaddy saying:
1. Some domain names don’t go to auction and are instead held by the registrar in their own portfolios (you called this “warehousing” by the registrar). This is probably less than 0.001% of the domain names….actually, probably even less. I suspect it would only be premium domain names with massive exact match local search quantities. Not surprisingly, I cannot find any information from registrars about their procedure, quantities of domains their keep, or ICANN’s rules (if any) about this.
Your best chance of getting it is contacting the current registrant and negotiating to buy it. After that, your best chance is buying it in auction or finding it listed with a “buy it now” price at a marketplace. Your other option is to find a broker who can negotiate on your behalf (if the domain name sells for a few thousand or higher…brokers likely won’t have the time or inclination to negotiate smaller deals).
It is very possible that the owner has a recurring payment in place, or that the owner renews after it expires. Because GoDaddy gives a redemption period like all registrar, many domain name investors will actually allow their domains to go through auction to see what the “market value” is of a domain name and THEN renew it. It sucks if you’re the buyer thinking you won the auction. It happens often, unfortunately.
Finally, if you were to manually check for drop domains, you have to jump through many hoops. It's a very labor intensive and often confusing process. When you see that a domain name is available, you shouldn’t just stop there. You should also pay attention to how many backlinks it had, how niche-specific the domain is, what kind of websites link to it, did it get signals from social media, and other indicators of quality. If you were to try to look for drop domains manually, it can be a very, very intimidating process. Thankfully, there is an easier solution.

The better quality links (From Google, Wikipedia) that a website has the higher will be its domain authority. New websites start with a ranking of one, and as the number of links increase the domain authority rises. For example, a sports website that has links to sports newspapers and sports reporting sites will have a higher domain authority than a sports website that only has links to other sports and sports blogging sites.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
You can easily find domains using the best metrics available from Ahrefs, Moz, Majestic, SEMRush, Similar Web, SEMrush, Domain Scope and Social Networks. We buy only the best, the latest, and, the most comprehensive industry wide metrics so you have the maximum amount of information to make a decision. No other tool gives you access to 90+ metrics.
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