Also, I currently have two other domains that are registered with Squarespace, and I have their annual payments set up automatically so I never have to manually pay (and so nobody else gets that window of opportunity to take the domain away from me). Would it be possible that the owner of this domain might just have a similar system in place and that I might be wasting my time?
And then you hit on ‘search’ and ‘all auctions’ and this is going to go out to lots of different auction sites, in fact I’m just going to stop this search, and it’s going to go out to all of these domain auction sites, find a list of domains that are relevant to your keywords and then pull back all of the data that you need to make a good buying decision.
Answer: Yes. For a vast majority of domain names that expire (greater than 99%+), the rules and processes listed above are valid. However, there appear to be exceptions to these rules. For example, registrars “warehouse” or take for their own domain name portfolios some domain names, and other domain names a renewed even past their expired or redemption periods. In addition, there is at least one registrar that does not have an auction partner, allowing expired domain names to simply drop and be available for hand register.
Also, I currently have two other domains that are registered with Squarespace, and I have their annual payments set up automatically so I never have to manually pay (and so nobody else gets that window of opportunity to take the domain away from me). Would it be possible that the owner of this domain might just have a similar system in place and that I might be wasting my time?
Hey, what’s up everybody. It’s Brian Dean from Quick Sprout. In this video, I’m going to show you how to buy affordable expired domains and how to evaluate the potential value that an expired domain could bring to your site. Now, expired domains is pretty gray hat, black hat type of thing because there’s basically two things you’re going to do in an expired domain.
If you are pursuing option 1, then you will want to use an automated service for the reasons mentioned in the article. Follow the process in the article to see which registrar the domain name is located at. If it’s at a Auction House like GoDaddy, NameJet or SnapNames, I believe they publicly share if there is a backorder on a domain name but not who placed that backorder. (Any interest in a domain name may be enough for someone else to place a backorder, thereby driving interest in the domain name that may be visible to the registrant.) So if the domain is at a registrar partnered with one of these companies, then you’ll have to monitor it manually (via calendar entries based on the whois expiration data) to maintain your distance.

I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?
So, what I like to do is also choose DMAS listed entry. No fake or no unsure page rank. Click the apply filter button and this will show us a much better group of websites, including a lot of high page rank websites. That’s one great thing about Go Daddy Auctions that you don’t have to guess about what the rank will be which is not the case with a lot of deleted domains which, because they were deindexed they didn’t have any content, they didn’t have any hosting, they don’t have any page rank. So, you have to make an estimation.
For example, placing your backorder at NameJet will reveal your interest to other potential buyers so if no other backorders are present you should wait until the last possible moment before the deadline to place your backorder — because if you’re the only backorder, you’ll get it for the minimum $39 bid on expiring names and it won’t go to auction.
Domain names expire when someone decides to stop renewing it. They may not be available to register immediately. We update the search index every night, so some names may already be renewed or re-registered. Some may become available in a few days. Some registrars, like GoDaddy, will let you buy a name that one of their own customers expire immediately. When you find a name you like, just click on it to try backordering the name!
Something similar happend to me in an auction a couple of weeks ago, I won the item, I paid for it, got an email with receipt and all, and then the next day they took it away from me and got the refund.. I know it sucks…… Some auction sites take a lot of time to upgrade their auctions, and this complicate things to, u can win an item in sedo, and still be listed in go daddy or vicceversa, sometimes it takes them days, I once called go daddy and told them, “hey! That domain in auction is mine” , “oh, sorry we haven’t upgraded”..
Everybody going to start using old domains should also know how to get them, I'm going to post soon article about it on seomoz as there are several ways starting from online rankings and lists up to dedicated seo tools that you can run on your computer and get precise and actual data on demand for any domains lists. Anybody intersting in such tools please visit our website: http://en.exdomain.eu/
Contains, Starts, Ends You can use the search bar to search for domains that contain particular keywords you are seeking, e.g. a search for "car" will yield results for all expired domain names that contain the term "car". You can also use the search tool to find domains that begin, or end with the search term too, with the drop down box next to the search form.
You can add it as part of a private blog network or you can 301 redirect an expired domain to your site to bring some trust and authority to your site. Now, in my experience, the best place to look for expired domains is this free website called expireddomains.net. So, you just have to head over there, make a free account and this is the page that you’ll see when you log in.
The database also gives us the chance to analyse Whois, IP, NS, MX records and website content of every domain and to offer unique investigation and brand monitoring services for which websites like Whois.Domaintools.com charge a lot of money. With the tools we have developed we can offer Reverse IP, Whois investigation and B2B research in bulk at a world class quality/price ratio.
I’m trying to get a hold a domain name that’s the name of my business. The domain is “[domainremoved].com”. I own the “.US” version of it, but I really want the “.Com” version. It’s been registered since 2009 by Proxy Tech Privacy Services with Alpine Domains (registrar) and is expiring next month. They aren’t using the domain for anything other than a rip-off service to make websites. I got a quote to see how much they are charging for just the domain and it’s in the thousands! Ridiculous!!!
Great post! I tried to repurpose an expired domain to build an authority site (your method 1) – but it doesn’t rank as it should. i checked the backlink profile via majestic and archive.org and it’s clean. also checked the metrics of the competition. with the amount of trust and link juice my expired domain has vs. the competition, it should be on page 1 for those keywords. is there something i’m missing here?
There is no easy way to explain “all” things about expired domain names. As you stated Michael, Network Solutions domain names go to the partnered domain auction service NameJet.com BUT, not “all” do… NSI customers have the option to opt-out of having expired domains go to auction. If a customer picks this option, the domain name would go through the drop process and go PendingDelete around the 71st day after the expire date. When it is released from the registry, the domain name is fair game to the major dropcatching services and the private ones. This still doesn’t mean anybody would grab it, and the domain may become available to hand register.

Finally, just because you have an idea doesn’t mean that you have more rights to a domain name. That’s not the way the system works. For example, Microsoft owns more than 75,000 domain names. Surely they’re not using them all — but they were acquired through purchasing businesses, hand registering them for business ideas, defensively registering them, etc. And they have the right to do so, just like you do for any idea that they have yet to come up with…just like a real estate investor does for a plot of land they have no intention of building upon for the next decade…just like an art collector does who wraps a Picasso and puts it in their basement.

What DomCop does for you, is show you a list of all these domains along with important metrics for every domain. These metrics, along with our powerful filtering and sorting capabilities, will help reduce the size of the daily list from 200,000+ to just a handful of the very best domains. What would take you hours, will now literally take you seconds to do.

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