If you bid at NameJet *after* the domain name moves to Pending Delete status, then it’s too late for NameJet to take advantage of their relationship with eNom and take control of the name. So then eNom thinks, “no interest from NameJet users; we’ll just drop it” and it goes through the regular deletion process — where the fastest fingers can register it. In some cases, investors don’t want to pay the $59 or $69 fee at NameJet and if there are no bids they can likely get it for $18.99 at Pheenix or using other dropcatching services.
Simple question: say I get the URL I want via auction for however umpteen hundreds of dollars, what about the renewal prices? Am I at the mercy of the auction house every year I want to renew it? Is it as simple as paying 10 or 15 bucks a year like with GoDaddy with a URL I got not through an Auction? I’m willing to pay for the desired URL up front but I don’t know what that entails down the pike.

Contains, Starts, Ends You can use the search bar to search for domains that contain particular keywords you are seeking, e.g. a search for "car" will yield results for all expired domain names that contain the term "car". You can also use the search tool to find domains that begin, or end with the search term too, with the drop down box next to the search form.


For example, placing your backorder at NameJet will reveal your interest to other potential buyers so if no other backorders are present you should wait until the last possible moment before the deadline to place your backorder — because if you’re the only backorder, you’ll get it for the minimum $39 bid on expiring names and it won’t go to auction.
Finally, if you were to manually check for drop domains, you have to jump through many hoops. It's a very labor intensive and often confusing process. When you see that a domain name is available, you shouldn’t just stop there. You should also pay attention to how many backlinks it had, how niche-specific the domain is, what kind of websites link to it, did it get signals from social media, and other indicators of quality. If you were to try to look for drop domains manually, it can be a very, very intimidating process. Thankfully, there is an easier solution.

We just need to take the Archive.org url and plug it into the Dom Recovery software and again, if you just hit recover, paste in the snapshot, click next, next, finish, and I’m going to let this one run in real time for you so you can see just how quick it is, and right now it is downloading the initial page, and now it’s downloading all of the other pages.
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option.
Okay, so let's run it. I'm just going to copy those in there to give it a bit of a kick start, but I'm on modern fiber UK fiber, so that might actually be too slow still, but yeah just trial and error with the amoount of crawlng threads, because it depends what kind of resources your PC has, and what kind of connection you're on. Okay, so we'll come back in a minute, oh by the way also, you can get the DA and the PA for each result for any of the crawl types. As long as you put in your MOZ key in the settings, so I just paused the video because I want to play around with the settings, because I haven't used this on my home fibre and I found on my UK fibre, these things worked pretty well but, like I said it will vary from connection to connection and machines to machine as well. So because I want some results to show you pretty quickly. I swapped it for website list and we're going to crawl some directories because they're always really good for finding tons of expired domains.
Finding good aged high DA domains with natural links for SEO and filtering them through our expired domain tools is really easy. Contact us with your SEO or PBN needs to receive an offer. If you need domains for a private blog network, 301 redirects or other SEO strategies, then contact us!. Our pool is huge but so many domains are being bought that it’s diminishing at a fast rate.

From a most basic perspective, any website or platform on the internet that allows people to post a link which goes to an outside site is a potential source of traffic. However, traffic sources are not created equal. Some traffic sources are very problematic. For example, if you were to go to social media sites and just share content and links, chances are, somebody at some time will object to that practice. They would say you’re spamming. It's very easy to get your affiliate account shut down because people complain. Similarly, you could be blogging for what seems like forever and fail to get much love from search engines.
Simple question: say I get the URL I want via auction for however umpteen hundreds of dollars, what about the renewal prices? Am I at the mercy of the auction house every year I want to renew it? Is it as simple as paying 10 or 15 bucks a year like with GoDaddy with a URL I got not through an Auction? I’m willing to pay for the desired URL up front but I don’t know what that entails down the pike.
Your best chance of getting it is contacting the current registrant and negotiating to buy it. After that, your best chance is buying it in auction or finding it listed with a “buy it now” price at a marketplace. Your other option is to find a broker who can negotiate on your behalf (if the domain name sells for a few thousand or higher…brokers likely won’t have the time or inclination to negotiate smaller deals).
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Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
What you really want to do first is scroll down to where it says, referring pages for anchor phrases. All that is is the anchor text distribution to that site. As you can see here this looks like a very natural link profile. Brand name, a product that they had, no text, URL, shopping cart, wireless government. These are the keywords that were related to what that site was about. Okay?

If the domain name is not with any auction house partner (I think that’s what you’re saying), then you can use a drop catch service anytime: https://www.domainsherpa.com/domain-name-backorder-services/ They do not make your order public information as NameJet and others do by sharing how many bids are placed on a domain name and thereby driving interest.
I had two domains, a .com and .net with godaddy. I’m beyond their redemption period ($80 fee), but they said it should be released back to the public domain soon and I may be able to get it back. Before I knew this, I paid $12.99 plus ican fees for the .com thinking it was available as the rep told me she was able to add it their cart, and I paid a $24.95 fee for back ordering my .net domain. Shortly thereafter, I received an email from godaddy saying:
Ultimately, I was left with a semi-automated process of scraping sites and running an intricate series of processes to come up with a list of expired domains that I then had to evaluate by hand. This meant I had Majestic and Moz open to check the backlink anchor text and Archive.org to check for obvious spam for every single possible domain. The process was excruciatingly slow and tedious, but absolutely necessary to find domains that would be suitable for building out.

When you see one that looks pretty good you can just click on the bid button and you’ll be taken to Go Daddy Auctions which shows some more information about the domain bidding process, how many people have bid, the traffic potential per month, the price which is now $12. How much time is left? You can make a bid. It’s based on the link profile and it’s relevancy, authority and your budget. This domain looks like a good bet for you.
Also, I currently have two other domains that are registered with Squarespace, and I have their annual payments set up automatically so I never have to manually pay (and so nobody else gets that window of opportunity to take the domain away from me). Would it be possible that the owner of this domain might just have a similar system in place and that I might be wasting my time?
The easiest and least time consuming option is to 301 redirect the old domain to your existing site. This tactic obviously works best if both sites are in the same sector and are targeting the same keywords; otherwise, if you have a pet supply site and you buy an old Texas Hold 'Em poker site, a redirect probably might raise some eyebrows among the search engines. If, however, your site is brandnamepets.com and you buy onlinepetsupply.com and 301 redirect the domain over, you're inheriting a lot of topical and appropriate links. 

Let’s just say for example we wanted this site, crystalgiftsworld.com. It looked good based on our analysis and we’d head over to Snap Names, Nameja is another one and what these service do is they have special technology on their site that allows them to try  to register a domain on your behalf over and over again. Okay? If you tried to do that your IP would get banned, but they have some system where they know how to do it just enough to get the domain, but not enough to get blacklisted.
Domain Hunter Gatherer is a specialized software that helps internet marketers to easily find expired domains quickly and efficiently. First, you can use it to crawl multiple domain auction sites. You can easily monitor many different domain exchanges so you can scoop up the latest and greatest dropped domains. Secondly, you can use Domain Hunter Gatherer to crawl Web 2.0 sites. Now, you may be thinking, “I'm looking for drop domains here, what do Web 2.0 sites have to do with my search?” Well, you would be overlooking one of the best ways to add value to your private blog network. While you don't legally own your Web 2.0 site, you can use your accounts to redirect the links to your target sites. The best part is that many people who build up nice looking and high goodwill Web 2.0 pages end up abandoning them. Many Web 2.0 platforms enable people to re-register or claim abandoned Web 2.0 accounts. By using Domain Hunter Gatherer, you can find these accounts and filter them by niche as well as quality indicators and then redirect their links to your target sites. Your private blog network goes up in value because of a more diverse backlink footprint.
Today, the story is different. Domain name registrars realized that they could auction expired domain names to the highest bidder and generate additional revenue. If no one wanted the domain names in an auction, the domains would then drop and become available for anyone to register. Much of the time, however, domain names are successfully auctioned.
Great information! I’m actually looking to transfer one of my websites to other domain and I wasn’t so sure which should I choose it to make the best choice. I had no idea until now that you can use an expired domain. But what are the costs of such domains? But the expired domain aren’t very expensive? Due to the fact that they belonged to websites with great daily traffic? What is the price range of an expired domain?

Now, a lot of times these great domains that have pending delete will get snapped up in a flash. Okay? You want to use the same system that’s 500,000 domains so you can always sort them by whatever you want to do to make sure you’re only looking at quality domains and look at the link profile the same way. Once you find one that you like, you can’t just sit on your computer at Go Daddy and wait for it drop on 6/14 and expect to get it because there’s going to be a lot of other people gunning for that domain. You actually have to use a service like Snap Name.

The way this list is implemented means I can't update prices, nor removed sold domains automatically and sedo doesn't provide me with the tools I need to implement it properly. Unfortunately some users keep contacting me to update their domain prices or remove their domains and I can't keep doing that manually. So I've decided to disable the list for now.
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