If you really don’t want to spend anything at all for your domain, that’s okay too. There are lots of ways you can get a free domain name for your website How to Get a Free Domain Name for Your Website How to Get a Free Domain Name for Your Website Why pay for a domain name when you can get a free domain name with your website? Read More . In the end, a domain name is really only a small part of your site. Really, the success of a site depends largely upon what you decide to do with it.
Sometimes people purchase domains that they plan to build a website on or sell in the future, but it just doesn’t end up happening. If an individual decides that it is no longer worth the yearly investment of keeping the domain in their account, they may choose to let it expire. Or, someone might just forget to renew the domain before the expiration date. If this happens, it’s a great chance for other domain investors to score rare domain names that are pending delete. Spending time perusing the list of recently dropped domains can be a worthwhile way to find high quality domains.

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The first is the link profile I and actually took this example carbondsystems.com because it looked like a pretty good choice. It’s from 2003. It has some links, some age and it’s in DMAS and looked at the link profile in DMAS. So, you just copy and paste the domain,  the home page it to here, click on the search links button and this will show you all the links to that site.
I am really new to all this. I am about to launch my blog in the next week. I have a domain and a wordpress blog set ready to go. Clearly it will have no traffic from day one and I guess it will take a while to build up. So my question is would you advise a begginer like me to stick with the one blog for a while and build it up. Or is it worth investing the time early on to master how to find expired domains and link them to the blog?
I've seen some people comment about losing the link value of domains that have expired and picked up, but what about non-expired domains?  Let's say a competitor is going out of business and they still have a year or two left, and we buy their domain and site.  Is there a risk changing registrant info and registrars, even if I keep their site up and mostly the same as before?  I was under the impression that I'd want to keep it under their name so as not to hit the uber-reset button on the domain's inbound link value.
* “Thousands of domain names that reach expired status never make it to any auction service and are released by the registry.” I think this is only if the registrar a) has an auction partner and b) nobody places a bid at the auction house. In that case, it drops normally and is deleted from the registry and available for anyone to hand register — including backorder services like SnapNames.com or Pool.com. I’m not sure why a registrar wouldn’t list an expiring domain name at the auction house as it could lead to extra revenue for them. Can you, Jamie?

The first is the link profile I and actually took this example carbondsystems.com because it looked like a pretty good choice. It’s from 2003. It has some links, some age and it’s in DMAS and looked at the link profile in DMAS. So, you just copy and paste the domain,  the home page it to here, click on the search links button and this will show you all the links to that site.

Thank you for a very informative article. I am still a bit confused on a couple of things. There is a domain that I have been looking to purchase for about a year now and it expires within the next 24 hours. It is with name.com and appears for backorder at snapnames but not at namejet. I am assuming this is because they are both connected auction houses?
I am trying to find the auction house partnered with “Registration Technologies, Inc.” (http://registrationtek.com/). They appear ancient, but still active. I have attempted to contact them and received no response to my queries. How would I go about finding the auction house they are partnered with? Are you certain that all auctioning partnerships are exclusive?
If you really don’t want to spend anything at all for your domain, that’s okay too. There are lots of ways you can get a free domain name for your website How to Get a Free Domain Name for Your Website How to Get a Free Domain Name for Your Website Why pay for a domain name when you can get a free domain name with your website? Read More . In the end, a domain name is really only a small part of your site. Really, the success of a site depends largely upon what you decide to do with it.
Backlinks – These are basically anchor links present on external websites that take the visitor back to a domain. The higher the number and authority of backlinks, the higher the authority of a domain. For example, if a domain has a backlink from Forbes, TechCrunch or BBC, it’ll gain a lot of authority in the eyes of Google and other search engines. It’s like attaching a reference letter from Bill Gates to your CV.
Page authority ranking criteria are similar to domain authority. It’s ranked on a scale of 1 to 100. Page Authority measures the predictive ranking of a web page. The page authority of a website can change depending on various metrics. Search engines examine the relevance and authority of a page based on its contents and external links. If a webpage has links to higher authority sites and has keywords in it, its authority ranking will increase.

If you bid at NameJet *after* the domain name moves to Pending Delete status, then it’s too late for NameJet to take advantage of their relationship with eNom and take control of the name. So then eNom thinks, “no interest from NameJet users; we’ll just drop it” and it goes through the regular deletion process — where the fastest fingers can register it. In some cases, investors don’t want to pay the $59 or $69 fee at NameJet and if there are no bids they can likely get it for $18.99 at Pheenix or using other dropcatching services.


Searching for a suitable domain name for your website can be quite trying. The reason for this is that the names that you want to get have already been assigned and are not available. As an SEO you know the importance of getting a domain name that describes your business as closely as possible. For example, if you are running a car rental service, you will look for a domain name that has the words ‘car’ and ‘rental’ in it. So if you can’t find a suitable name, you could use the expired domains tool which might show you domain names that would meet your requirements.
The better quality links (From Google, Wikipedia) that a website has the higher will be its domain authority. New websites start with a ranking of one, and as the number of links increase the domain authority rises. For example, a sports website that has links to sports newspapers and sports reporting sites will have a higher domain authority than a sports website that only has links to other sports and sports blogging sites.

Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option.
Answer: Registrars are not set-up to negotiate the selling price of expiring domain names. Their technical support team likely won’t even know what you’re referring to, let alone who to refer your inquiry to. It’s likely your offer won’t even be worth their time to handle. Unless you know the founder, president or chief operating officer of the registrar, you won’t even be able to have a dialogue about it. In addition, depending on how they interpret the ICANN registrar rules, it may not even be possible.
Some jerk stole my .com domain name after I had owned it for 10 years and accidentally let it expire, and he’s trying to extort lots of money from me for its return. On the site where it says who owns it, it says “Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited”. What does that mean? The domain expires on September 26. He’ll probably automatically renew it, like he has for the past couple of years. But in case it becomes available, I want to grab it. I’m the only person in the world with my name, and I posted at a blog for 10 years with that domain name. So I’m really upset I don’t have my own name anymore.

Great information! I’m actually looking to transfer one of my websites to other domain and I wasn’t so sure which should I choose it to make the best choice. I had no idea until now that you can use an expired domain. But what are the costs of such domains? But the expired domain aren’t very expensive? Due to the fact that they belonged to websites with great daily traffic? What is the price range of an expired domain?
Some people might want to skip that because they think that they've already been crawled, which is a possibility and you can apply a manual exclusion to any results you think are going to be returned on Google for your search query. So things like YouTube, you don't want to crawl, then you can add them in there and it will ignore them if they returned in the search results. Okay, so that's yeah! That's pretty much the search setting query settings here. So your search terms go here. You can have as many as you like just enter them in their line separated.

1. Some domain names don’t go to auction and are instead held by the registrar in their own portfolios (you called this “warehousing” by the registrar). This is probably less than 0.001% of the domain names….actually, probably even less. I suspect it would only be premium domain names with massive exact match local search quantities. Not surprisingly, I cannot find any information from registrars about their procedure, quantities of domains their keep, or ICANN’s rules (if any) about this.


Hi Kulwant, these are great tips as usual. I particularly like the way to tell us to check the google pagerank in case the domain has been banned – that could lower the usefulness of the domain quite a bit. One thing though, don’t you think that buying domains is sometimes immoral? Like sometimes you accidentally buy a domain of somebody elses website who forgot to renew.
If you bought the domain name, the typical procedure is to unlock the domain name, then either push it to your account at the same registrar (such as https://www.domainsherpa.com/how-to-push-a-domain-name-at-godaddy-com/) or send you the authorization code so you can transfer the domain name to a different registrar (https://www.domainsherpa.com/how-to-transfer-a-domain-name-to-another-registrar/).
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Regarding my statement above, “Any domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be auctioned by an auction service.”–it did overstretch. I’ve modified it to be: “A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule).” Then I added a FAQ to clarify. Please check my thinking:
When you are searching for the expired domain which you might consider buying, you can conduct expired domains search and learn how to buy expired domains. Or you can take an easier route and go to searchenginereports.net from your browser’s search bar. Once you are on the site, click on the ‘Free SEO Tools’ icon. Scroll down the list of free SEO tools icons till you come to ‘Expired Domains Tool’ icon.

What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
Since high quality expired domains are in low supply, the huge numbers of marketers competing for those drop domains tend to drive prices up. Also, if you use an exchange, you’re basically lucky to get whatever you can afford. In other words, niche specificity isn't guaranteed. This is going to be a problem because as Google continues to evolve, it is cracking down on domain niche relevance. In other words, its software is fast evolving to the point that it can tell what the niche of a particular domain is. If your private blog network is a patchwork of expired domains that involve many different and dissimilar niches, then you might be in trouble. You are at great risk of being penalized by Google.
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