One of the ways to make the most of this strategy is to sign up for Mobidea. Whatever expired domain you may have, there are high odds that Mobidea would have an offer that’s relevant to your domain’s niche. You simply host your website on the expired domain, place Mobidea’s offers on your website and whenever you make a sale through your website, you receive an affiliate commission!
2) prerelease auctions.  These are domains where the auction venue has contracted with the registrar, like Fabulous or Moniker, to auction off non-renewed domains.  Just before a domain enters the pending delete process, it goes to a private auction to any person who has backordered the name.  Some people feel that back links on these type of auctions still provide a SEO benifit. My testing indicates that there is zero SEO benifit when these domains are redirected into another site.  So if you get a domain with "pink squirels" in a lot of achor text to a domain and then point it at your domain, you don't rank for "pink squirels"
A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule). The domain name does not immediately go into auction, but is immediately listed on the partnered auction service with an auction scheduled for the near future. Such a domain name will be exclusive to that specific auction service.
Domain Hunter Gatherer also makes expired domain detection less painful. As I've mentioned above, finding drop domains on your own can be like taking shots in the dark, or trying to find a needle in a haystack. You’re more than welcome to try it, but I’m telling you, it’s not going to be a pleasant experience. With Domain Hunter Gatherer, you have many different options on how to search for drop domains. You can enter a search term and it will spit out sites that you can then crawl for dead links. You can then filter these dead links to see if they can be registered. You can also enter a site URL of a competitor and get dead links that way. You can even import web pages from Wikipedia or other websites to scan for dead links.
When searching from keyword DHG will take your list of keywords and search each one, the pages will then be crawled to find unique domains to check availability of. The process is relatively simple but very time consuming when done manually or semi automated as was necessary in the past. Luckily now the job can be set and left to work while you do something else.
If you bid at NameJet *after* the domain name moves to Pending Delete status, then it’s too late for NameJet to take advantage of their relationship with eNom and take control of the name. So then eNom thinks, “no interest from NameJet users; we’ll just drop it” and it goes through the regular deletion process — where the fastest fingers can register it. In some cases, investors don’t want to pay the $59 or $69 fee at NameJet and if there are no bids they can likely get it for $18.99 at Pheenix or using other dropcatching services.

What about option #4 - Redirect your existing domain to the old domain? I bought an old domain that is 100% relevant to my current domain but currently has with very little content. It did have more content fours years ago. The old domain is 13 years old, pr=3, while my current is 7 months old pr=1 and a decent amount of content. The old domain I purchased was not expired though and I do not know if this makes a difference. What are the pros and cons of option #4? Am I correct to think that option #1 would result in no benefit from the old domain's age value and if so why is it not listed as a con, a MAJOR one. Its hard to believe that a 301 using option 1 would give my existing domain 13 years credit but I'll take it if it does.
The first is the link profile I and actually took this example carbondsystems.com because it looked like a pretty good choice. It’s from 2003. It has some links, some age and it’s in DMAS and looked at the link profile in DMAS. So, you just copy and paste the domain,  the home page it to here, click on the search links button and this will show you all the links to that site.
Something similar happend to me in an auction a couple of weeks ago, I won the item, I paid for it, got an email with receipt and all, and then the next day they took it away from me and got the refund.. I know it sucks…… Some auction sites take a lot of time to upgrade their auctions, and this complicate things to, u can win an item in sedo, and still be listed in go daddy or vicceversa, sometimes it takes them days, I once called go daddy and told them, “hey! That domain in auction is mine” , “oh, sorry we haven’t upgraded”..
Now a lot of time, you'll search for things and you'll think you're getting niche website's back, but actually, in fact, because of Google's shift towards big authority websites, you'll get things like Amazon listings. So if you don't want to end up crawling those big authority websites - and you want just the smaller ones, then you can make sure that the website, you'll crawl from the search engine results, is relevant by putting in a metadata requirement here. So any results that come back from the scrape of Google for any of these search terms, here you can say that they must contain one of these things, so what you can do is you can just put that your search terms in there back into there into the metadata requirement. So then, when a result comes back from google, it will loop through these line, separated terms and it'll say this is a homepage metadata, so the title, the keyword, the description, does it contain these?

Great post! I tried to repurpose an expired domain to build an authority site (your method 1) – but it doesn’t rank as it should. i checked the backlink profile via majestic and archive.org and it’s clean. also checked the metrics of the competition. with the amount of trust and link juice my expired domain has vs. the competition, it should be on page 1 for those keywords. is there something i’m missing here?
Hey , Nice Article . Just have one query . I read your article and the issue is I want to buy one expired domain which is too good but how can I fill the reconsideration request as the domain is banned . I have not purchased the domain yet because I want to purchase it when the domain gets unbanned . So if you check Google.com/webmasters/tools/reconsideration – Requesting reconsideration of: which is only showing the websites I have in the account .. So how can I add the domain name there . OR first of all I have to buy the domain add in GWT and then send reconsideration request . If that is so then I guess you should have mentioned in the article I suppose ? Let me know thanks

However, Pool uses what some have called a “two-phase” auction system. This means that once you win your original backorder, Pool will then move you into the auction phase where you compete with other bidders for the domain. Pool doesn’t reveal how many bidders there are or what they’re bidding, so you have to offer the highest price you’re willing to if you want to get that dream domain.
They are easy to type and remember: You can’t get a easy to remember new domain name without paying huge bucks these days. Gone are the days where you can simply grab almost any incredible domain name just by paying a couple of bucks. This is one of the major reasons most people look for expired domains because most expired domains are short and sweet.

Your best chance of getting it is contacting the current registrant and negotiating to buy it. After that, your best chance is buying it in auction or finding it listed with a “buy it now” price at a marketplace. Your other option is to find a broker who can negotiate on your behalf (if the domain name sells for a few thousand or higher…brokers likely won’t have the time or inclination to negotiate smaller deals).
I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?
The other way you could profit off expired domain names is redirecting the traffic to your affiliate link. For illustration, if you have an affiliate link that sells beauty products, and the expired domain name was mentioned or ranked in a high authority website for terms related to beauty products you can redirect the traffic there to make sales. One sale is enough to make you a decent profit.

I registered for backordering with GoDaddy last year, as i saw goddady was the registar of the domain i wanted. However when the deadline for renewal came, i got a message the expiration date had changed to expire… well, a year later, i.e. now in 4 days. How can the expiration date be postponed? Was that the registrant renewed? does that mean the domain never becomes available and never goes to auction?


Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
Thousands of domain names expire every day. The reasons are different. Some owners forgot to renew the domains, some just don't want them anymore or they moved on to other projects. For most people these so called Expired Domains don't have any value. They just see a bunch of Domain Names someone else deleted and move on, but for the people who know about SEO or the value of good Backlinks, Expired Domain Names are money just waiting to get picked up from the street. The only problem is to separate the good ones from the bad ones. That is where ExpiredDomains.net comes into play.
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