The database also gives us the chance to analyse Whois, IP, NS, MX records and website content of every domain and to offer unique investigation and brand monitoring services for which websites like Whois.Domaintools.com charge a lot of money. With the tools we have developed we can offer Reverse IP, Whois investigation and B2B research in bulk at a world class quality/price ratio.

Let's face it, if you want to make money off the internet, you have to wrap your mind around one central rule: no traffic means no money. Making money online is all about being able to generate traffic from social media sites, search engines, and all other sources of online traffic. It's impossible to make money as an affiliate if you don't have traffic to convert into cold hard dollars. There are, of course, many ways to generate traffic. You can write content and organically attract search engine traffic. You can post a unique blog post on willing third party blogs and enjoy direct traffic along with SEO benefits. You can also promote affiliate links on social media platforms and get traffic that way. In fact, if you really think about it hard enough, generating traffic is really not that difficult.
The whitelist filter for wanted characters is now split into three filters. The old whitelist is now named whitelist (only). When used, the domain has to consist only of the defined characters or numbers. No other characters are allowed. The new whitelist (any) filter finds domains that have at least one of the defined characters or numbers. The new whitelist (all) filter finds domains that have all defined characters or numbers at least once.
Backlinks – These are basically anchor links present on external websites that take the visitor back to a domain. The higher the number and authority of backlinks, the higher the authority of a domain. For example, if a domain has a backlink from Forbes, TechCrunch or BBC, it’ll gain a lot of authority in the eyes of Google and other search engines. It’s like attaching a reference letter from Bill Gates to your CV.
Once a domain expires, the registrar will allow around 30 days for the original owner to renew it. This period depends on the registrar and can range from 2 weeks to a whole year. Once this period is over, the domain enters the "Pending Delete" status, during which it cannot be renewed, purchased or modified in any way. Once the Pending delete status is over, the domain is dropped back into the available pool, and can now be purchased by anyone.
If you buy keyword specific domains, you're really buying the type in traffic.  I use the URL builder and redirect through that URL so you can see how much traffic your getting from the keyword domain.  There seems to be no rythme or reason to what keyword domains deliver traffic and what don't.  By tracking traffic with the Google URL builder you get a feel for what names are giving you traffic and which are not. ie. the plural, the singular, two words, three words, the possessive, etc.
I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?
There are a lot of tools online that you can use to grab expired domain lists, but the tools that you can find here is unique because of its features. You will have great daily updated expired domains list with different TLDs that can be valuable for your work. This tools will find you deleted domains on different criterion. You can search by domain name search option and can have some great domains like you find on other websites like Fresh Drop, expired Domain, etc.
It will just go on and on and on endlessly, so that really is like a set and forget setting. Okay, now before I show you it in action, I'll just skim over some of these stats stuff. Here this is pretty self-explanatory really so that's the amount pages crawled so far, that's how many pages were crawling per minute, so once it's been running for a minute that that'll date and they'll update every minute after that. That is if the websites are blocking are crawl. Thatw how many websites currently are been crawled, so how many websites have been crawled. That's if we have it have it had any registrar errors, so we fired off some domains to see if they're available or not and there's been any errors in checking them it displays there.
Hi guys it's Jamie from SuperGrowth.com and in this video I'm going to show you how to use my expired domain finder, so the title kind of gives it away. Basically, this tool allows you to find expired domains that no one else wants, and hopefully they'll have good or worthwhile backlink profiles that you can either build your money site on to give you a competitive advantage in the search engines or you can use them to build a PBN so we'll work our way through these tabs and the associated settings and I'll show you what it can do.
No, no, no. ToysRUs made a perfectly logical decison that most any business would do and Google tanked them for it. ToysRUs wanted the url toys.com to direct to their site.  They're all about toys and they simply bought a url that described their business and told the url where to take people.  Google tanked them in the rankings because Toys.com came with link juice. Google assumed that Toys.com was doing this to manipulate the search engines but there is just, to my knowledge, ZERO evidence of this.  This is another case of Google caring more about the possible spam threat than the actual rankings for searchers.
I’m trying to get a hold a domain name that’s the name of my business. The domain is “[domainremoved].com”. I own the “.US” version of it, but I really want the “.Com” version. It’s been registered since 2009 by Proxy Tech Privacy Services with Alpine Domains (registrar) and is expiring next month. They aren’t using the domain for anything other than a rip-off service to make websites. I got a quote to see how much they are charging for just the domain and it’s in the thousands! Ridiculous!!!
A domain name that reaches expired status and is not renewed by the owner will be listed at an auction service (see FAQ for exception to this rule). The domain name does not immediately go into auction, but is immediately listed on the partnered auction service with an auction scheduled for the near future. Such a domain name will be exclusive to that specific auction service.
If you bought the domain name, the typical procedure is to unlock the domain name, then either push it to your account at the same registrar (such as https://www.domainsherpa.com/how-to-push-a-domain-name-at-godaddy-com/) or send you the authorization code so you can transfer the domain name to a different registrar (https://www.domainsherpa.com/how-to-transfer-a-domain-name-to-another-registrar/).
Your course of action really depends on how much work and effort you can put into the expired domain. If you're barely able to maintain and optimize your current site, you probably want to just 301 redirect the old site (note: see my amended comment above about the link value not likely to be passed). If, however, you're more creative and have some time on your hands, you can try your hand at crafting a microsite. If you really know your stuff and are experienced at making money off various websites, you'd probably do well with the third option.
Most popular auctions with expiring domains are at godaddy, namejet, snapnames. Search for expired domains name its very easy if you have domains list. With a bit luck, you can drop good one with PR5 cheaper like $200, just need to know which domain have not fake pr. List of domains are not free, but updated dailly with aprox. 50.000 new expiring domain names.
Once you get to this point you know there have been DMAS listed. They have a number of domains linking to them and according to the way back machine which is WBY, you can see their site age. So, if you want to go with an older site you can see right here whether or not this is a site that you might be interested in, but before pulling the trigger you do want to check two things.
Then the number is an HRL so it’ll be quite a bit different then you’ll see an expired domains because domain pop service is not very good compared to HREFs. Usually this shows about 20 percent of the total lengths. This shows more like 80. Okay? As you can see it has actually 162 referring domains which is quite a lot better than we saw in expired domains.
Ultimately, I was left with a semi-automated process of scraping sites and running an intricate series of processes to come up with a list of expired domains that I then had to evaluate by hand. This meant I had Majestic and Moz open to check the backlink anchor text and Archive.org to check for obvious spam for every single possible domain. The process was excruciatingly slow and tedious, but absolutely necessary to find domains that would be suitable for building out.
See https://www.domainsherpa.com/domain-name-dictionary/life-cycle-of-a-typical-gtld-domain-name/. They start it in auction listings after it expires and before pending delete. I don’t know the exact dates, but if you monitor it you’ll see it go from auction, to closeout, to drop. You’ll need an auctions.godaddy.com account (I believe $5 per year) to bid and buy.

SEO is not as easy as it used to be. The market is very saturated now, content is now incredibly easy to generate and publish. Everyone and his dog (or gran!) can make a wordpress website. The main ranking factor for Google is still backlinks and will be for the foreseeable future. Your content might be better than your competitors but if they have more links they'll simply always outrank you and receive more traffic. Fair or not, its a fact. This method can see you get the strong backlink profile you need to rank #1. Please note a PBN is considered black hat so please diversify your backlink profile and do your research first.
There is no easy way to explain “all” things about expired domain names. As you stated Michael, Network Solutions domain names go to the partnered domain auction service NameJet.com BUT, not “all” do… NSI customers have the option to opt-out of having expired domains go to auction. If a customer picks this option, the domain name would go through the drop process and go PendingDelete around the 71st day after the expire date. When it is released from the registry, the domain name is fair game to the major dropcatching services and the private ones. This still doesn’t mean anybody would grab it, and the domain may become available to hand register.
However, what do you think about buying expired high PR domains and creating local directories, business reivew, and event calendar sites that actually provide a value to the community? Then include a sponsored link from local business that is trying to rank? Do you think a method like that is a. morally soluble and b. viable long-term because it creates value?
However, Pool uses what some have called a “two-phase” auction system. This means that once you win your original backorder, Pool will then move you into the auction phase where you compete with other bidders for the domain. Pool doesn’t reveal how many bidders there are or what they’re bidding, so you have to offer the highest price you’re willing to if you want to get that dream domain.

By using GoDaddy auctions section, you can also use keywords to search the domain names that you are interested in. For instance, if you type the keyword something like “fitness”, it will list you out all the domain names that matches with the keyword “Fitness” so you can easily make a list of all the domain names with your desired keyword selection.


I am a rather gray-hat affiliate marketer by trade, but I"m looking more into going into local SEO and blogging ventures that I feel will be most sustainable. I am having serious moral issues with using any of my link building strategies, but the one I'm struggling morally and long-term strategy-wise is the use of a manufactured link-juice-flowing-thick private blog network. I believe the majority of these will ultimately fall by the wayside in the future when their social value and content are proven to lack substance by machine reading and advanced social metrics. 

Answer: Registrars are not set-up to negotiate the selling price of expiring domain names. Their technical support team likely won’t even know what you’re referring to, let alone who to refer your inquiry to. It’s likely your offer won’t even be worth their time to handle. Unless you know the founder, president or chief operating officer of the registrar, you won’t even be able to have a dialogue about it. In addition, depending on how they interpret the ICANN registrar rules, it may not even be possible.


The dropdate for the following TLDs is not verified. Domains might drop earlier or later: .eu .cat .travel .ae .af .as .at .aw .be .bg .bi .bj .bo .bw .cl .co .cx .cz .dk .dm .es .fi .fo .fr .gd .gg .gi .hk .hr .hu .ie .io .iq .ir .je .jp .ki .kz .lt .lu .lv .md .mg .mx .nl .nc .nf .no .nz .pe .pf .pl .pt .ru .sg .si .sm .sn .so .st .su .sx .to .uk .uz .za .berlin .cloud
×