I had two domains, a .com and .net with godaddy. I’m beyond their redemption period ($80 fee), but they said it should be released back to the public domain soon and I may be able to get it back. Before I knew this, I paid $12.99 plus ican fees for the .com thinking it was available as the rep told me she was able to add it their cart, and I paid a $24.95 fee for back ordering my .net domain. Shortly thereafter, I received an email from godaddy saying:
However, what do you think about buying expired high PR domains and creating local directories, business reivew, and event calendar sites that actually provide a value to the community? Then include a sponsored link from local business that is trying to rank? Do you think a method like that is a. morally soluble and b. viable long-term because it creates value?

The whitelist filter for wanted characters is now split into three filters. The old whitelist is now named whitelist (only). When used, the domain has to consist only of the defined characters or numbers. No other characters are allowed. The new whitelist (any) filter finds domains that have at least one of the defined characters or numbers. The new whitelist (all) filter finds domains that have all defined characters or numbers at least once.
Okay. So, let's move on to our next tab crawl from search query, something look at the settings. So if you want to limit the amount of results that you cruel per search query, you can tick that and specify, so if you only want to crawl the top three or ten results from each search query, you can enter that there. He'll just go to the end of the search. Next setting, results on Google skip the domain if it's in the majestic million, so the majestic million is just something from majestic, it's a free resource that majestic SEO makes available that shows the most popular hundred domains.

There is a secondary registrar check built-in, so shouldn't happen very often, so that's the amount external domains we found. Then out of those how many of them are expired domains we've found which will appear in here or in any of the other ones, depending on which type of crawl were running, and that's just simply how long this crewel has been running. So we've got a lot of the similar settings here, in the search query crawl. We have how many queries have been blocked, which you shouldn't get many with any blocked because you're, not hammering google, you know you're sending one query and then processing the results and then sending another query see not scraping Google all all at once. So that's how many queries we've done and how many we've got left to process.


I registered for backordering with GoDaddy last year, as i saw goddady was the registar of the domain i wanted. However when the deadline for renewal came, i got a message the expiration date had changed to expire… well, a year later, i.e. now in 4 days. How can the expiration date be postponed? Was that the registrant renewed? does that mean the domain never becomes available and never goes to auction?
Sometimes people purchase domains that they plan to build a website on or sell in the future, but it just doesn’t end up happening. If an individual decides that it is no longer worth the yearly investment of keeping the domain in their account, they may choose to let it expire. Or, someone might just forget to renew the domain before the expiration date. If this happens, it’s a great chance for other domain investors to score rare domain names that are pending delete. Spending time perusing the list of recently dropped domains can be a worthwhile way to find high quality domains.
Searching for a suitable domain name for your website can be quite trying. The reason for this is that the names that you want to get have already been assigned and are not available. As an SEO you know the importance of getting a domain name that describes your business as closely as possible. For example, if you are running a car rental service, you will look for a domain name that has the words ‘car’ and ‘rental’ in it. So if you can’t find a suitable name, you could use the expired domains tool which might show you domain names that would meet your requirements.
However, Pool uses what some have called a “two-phase” auction system. This means that once you win your original backorder, Pool will then move you into the auction phase where you compete with other bidders for the domain. Pool doesn’t reveal how many bidders there are or what they’re bidding, so you have to offer the highest price you’re willing to if you want to get that dream domain.
I am interested in a domain name that is set to expire in April 2016. The domain is registered with Domain.com, so I have placed a backorder on Snapnames.com (thanks for confirming I at least did that part right). I also placed backorders with NameJet.com and Pool.com, based on previous advice I received. Now I’m wondering if that might be overkill since Snapnames is the designated auction house. Will I ultimately end up bidding against myself?

Hello, since many years now my domain name has been stolen from me. Now it’s for sale but for $3000 and I don’t have that kind of money. My question is, if I backorder it, won’t this trigger the owner to keep on renewing it each year hoping that one day I will buy it from him? Isn’t there a way to reserve my domain name or get notified when it goes back to sell without the seller to know?
However, what do you think about buying expired high PR domains and creating local directories, business reivew, and event calendar sites that actually provide a value to the community? Then include a sponsored link from local business that is trying to rank? Do you think a method like that is a. morally soluble and b. viable long-term because it creates value?
Also, I currently have two other domains that are registered with Squarespace, and I have their annual payments set up automatically so I never have to manually pay (and so nobody else gets that window of opportunity to take the domain away from me). Would it be possible that the owner of this domain might just have a similar system in place and that I might be wasting my time?
Your best chance of getting it is contacting the current registrant and negotiating to buy it. After that, your best chance is buying it in auction or finding it listed with a “buy it now” price at a marketplace. Your other option is to find a broker who can negotiate on your behalf (if the domain name sells for a few thousand or higher…brokers likely won’t have the time or inclination to negotiate smaller deals).
Domain Hunter Gatherer also makes expired domain detection less painful. As I've mentioned above, finding drop domains on your own can be like taking shots in the dark, or trying to find a needle in a haystack. You’re more than welcome to try it, but I’m telling you, it’s not going to be a pleasant experience. With Domain Hunter Gatherer, you have many different options on how to search for drop domains. You can enter a search term and it will spit out sites that you can then crawl for dead links. You can then filter these dead links to see if they can be registered. You can also enter a site URL of a competitor and get dead links that way. You can even import web pages from Wikipedia or other websites to scan for dead links.
When you see one that looks pretty good you can just click on the bid button and you’ll be taken to Go Daddy Auctions which shows some more information about the domain bidding process, how many people have bid, the traffic potential per month, the price which is now $12. How much time is left? You can make a bid. It’s based on the link profile and it’s relevancy, authority and your budget. This domain looks like a good bet for you.
Here's an old post on search engine roundtable that claims google's policy is to discount previous backlink juice when a domain changes ownership.  I'm not convinced whether this is actually true or something Google says to discourage excessive domain buying / 301 redirecting for SEO benefit.  The comments above seem to give varying opinions on this matter. Would be great to get to the bottom of that one!

Domain Hunter Gatherer gives you a lot of options when it comes to getting a starting point for your drop domain search. This amazing tool also makes filtering drop domains so much easier. You have to understand that the vast majority of drop domains out there are complete junk. You have no business buying them. Unfortunately, if you don’t know how to filter correctly, most of these domains would look very attractive. You end up wasting your money on domain names that do not recoup the dollars you invested in them. Domain Hunter Gatherer makes filtering so much easier. It incorporates Moz and Majestic API support without requiring you to have an account on those services*. It quickly lets you know how many social media mentions a particular domain has, it lists out the number of backlinks that the domain used to have, and so on down the line. It's a very fast piece of software because it is multi-threaded. Finally, once you've identified certain domains you'd like to track, you can save them very easily. If you are looking to take your online income to the next level, you should definitely get your copy of the Domain Hunter Gatherer today. It will definitely make your life easier.


Since high quality expired domains are in low supply, the huge numbers of marketers competing for those drop domains tend to drive prices up. Also, if you use an exchange, you’re basically lucky to get whatever you can afford. In other words, niche specificity isn't guaranteed. This is going to be a problem because as Google continues to evolve, it is cracking down on domain niche relevance. In other words, its software is fast evolving to the point that it can tell what the niche of a particular domain is. If your private blog network is a patchwork of expired domains that involve many different and dissimilar niches, then you might be in trouble. You are at great risk of being penalized by Google.
Now the numbers of errors, for we give up crawling a web site in case you know, they've got some kind of anti scraping technology or the web sites just completely knackered or something thirty is generally fine. Limit number of pages crawled per website most the time you want that ticked. I have it about a hundred thousand less you are going to be crawling some particularly big websites. I like that there, because, if you have an endless, crawl and there's some kind of weird URL structure on a website like an old-school date picker or something you don't want to be endlessly stuck on that website. Show your URLs being crawled. Now, if you just want to see what it's doing, you can have it on for debugging sometimes, but I generally leave it off because it makes it slightly faster and writes results into a text file so as it goes along and it finds expired domains as well as showing you and the GUI here, you can write them into a text file just in case there's a crash or your PC shuts down or something like that.
When a domain name that was previously registered expires, it goes through a grace period that allows the previous registrant one last chance to reclaim their domain before it becomes available to new buyers. If the previous registrant still has not renewed their domain after the 77 day deletion process, the domain name will officially expire and enter the Aftermarket.
The great thing about this is that it’s kind of like a metasearch engine for all the places that you can find expired domains around the web. First, let’s look at deleted domains. Okay? To do that, you go click on the deleted domains button here and then click on any top level domain that you want to get. I prefer .com because it’s obviously the most common top level domain.
Although I have one query (this answer does answer it, but I have a doubt)… I just bought a domain which had the creation date as 2010 but after acquisition upon checking I found that it has been reset to 2014. So, from what I understand from your article, this could not be undone anyways because this particular domain’s status said as ‘Expired’ and I got it for under $10 from godaddy?
Simple question: say I get the URL I want via auction for however umpteen hundreds of dollars, what about the renewal prices? Am I at the mercy of the auction house every year I want to renew it? Is it as simple as paying 10 or 15 bucks a year like with GoDaddy with a URL I got not through an Auction? I’m willing to pay for the desired URL up front but I don’t know what that entails down the pike.
However, what do you think about buying expired high PR domains and creating local directories, business reivew, and event calendar sites that actually provide a value to the community? Then include a sponsored link from local business that is trying to rank? Do you think a method like that is a. morally soluble and b. viable long-term because it creates value?
Some jerk stole my .com domain name after I had owned it for 10 years and accidentally let it expire, and he’s trying to extort lots of money from me for its return. On the site where it says who owns it, it says “Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited”. What does that mean? The domain expires on September 26. He’ll probably automatically renew it, like he has for the past couple of years. But in case it becomes available, I want to grab it. I’m the only person in the world with my name, and I posted at a blog for 10 years with that domain name. So I’m really upset I don’t have my own name anymore.
At the end of the day, this article is geared to startups, business entrepreneurs, webmasters and marketing professionals who need to understand the process, and I guestimate that the process listed in the article above accounts for 99%+ of all expired domain names. All of your points are valid and appreciated, but if someone is interested in buying a good, brandable domain name for their business, they should follow the instructions above to have the best chance of grabbing it.

Finally, you want to head over to domaintools.com. Then put the domain into here. What this will do is it’ll show you the history of the domain, because a lot of times these domains have been dropped like four or five times and a lot of people in SEO feel this way. I’m not sure about it. If a domain has been dropped several times, then Google does actually devalue the links pointing to that domain. So, as you can see I just changed registrars a few times and it hasn’t been dropped or else it’ll say one drops or two drops.
Warehousing: I have no clue to a percentage of warehoused domains but I know it happens. Tucows even admitted it on my blog “I know you don’t like that we’re allowed to select expiring names for the Tucows Portfolio rather than letting them all go to auction or drop but that seems to be something we have to agree to disagree about.” ~ Ken Schafer (1st comment) http://www.dotweekly.com/could-you-explain-tucows
Internet Marketing is one of the best fields which have a great output potential, but using suitable tools for different tasks is what make it interesting. For newbies, it may not understandable, but for professional internet marketers, tools are everything. Among many tools of SEO (Search Engine Optimization), expired domains finder that finds expired domains with already build matrices are most attractive things. Online marketers are well aware of the fact that time is everything, so they try to find domains that have already great values to spare their time.

Hi, I purchased a .org domain in a Godaddy auction, actually the closeout auction so it had been renewable and then available as a closeout after 36 days. I purchased the closeout domain because I was thinking of using it as a catchy anagram. I instead offered it to the Trademarked company to purchase for a nice sum of money, and now they are threatening to file legal action against me for “Domain Squatting” saying that I purchased it in bad faith. etc… The way I see it, is it was available for them to renew for 26 days, and if it was not owned by them they had a window of 10 days to purchase the name before I did in the regular auction. What’s your thoughts on this?
Domain Hunter Gatherer is a specialized software that helps internet marketers to easily find expired domains quickly and efficiently. First, you can use it to crawl multiple domain auction sites. You can easily monitor many different domain exchanges so you can scoop up the latest and greatest dropped domains. Secondly, you can use Domain Hunter Gatherer to crawl Web 2.0 sites. Now, you may be thinking, “I'm looking for drop domains here, what do Web 2.0 sites have to do with my search?” Well, you would be overlooking one of the best ways to add value to your private blog network. While you don't legally own your Web 2.0 site, you can use your accounts to redirect the links to your target sites. The best part is that many people who build up nice looking and high goodwill Web 2.0 pages end up abandoning them. Many Web 2.0 platforms enable people to re-register or claim abandoned Web 2.0 accounts. By using Domain Hunter Gatherer, you can find these accounts and filter them by niche as well as quality indicators and then redirect their links to your target sites. Your private blog network goes up in value because of a more diverse backlink footprint.
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