Here’s examples of some of the other domains I remove from the list, domains that end in; .weebly.com .wordpress.com hop.clickbank.net .tumblr.com .webgarden.com .livejournal.com .webs.com .edu .yolasite.com .moonfruit.com .bravesites.com .webnode.com .web-gratis.net .tripod.com typepad.com blogs.com rinoweb.com jigsy.com google.com squarespace.com hubspot.com .forrester.com
Let's face it, if you want to make money off the internet, you have to wrap your mind around one central rule: no traffic means no money. Making money online is all about being able to generate traffic from social media sites, search engines, and all other sources of online traffic. It's impossible to make money as an affiliate if you don't have traffic to convert into cold hard dollars. There are, of course, many ways to generate traffic. You can write content and organically attract search engine traffic. You can post a unique blog post on willing third party blogs and enjoy direct traffic along with SEO benefits. You can also promote affiliate links on social media platforms and get traffic that way. In fact, if you really think about it hard enough, generating traffic is really not that difficult.

Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).

GoDaddy Auctions is a marketplace where GoDaddy lists domains that have expired and are in the renewal grace period. Apart from these GoDaddy also lists other domains, but the expiring auctions at GoDaddy are the most popular. Based on the percieved value of the domain, domainers and SEOs bid on these auctions. If the original owner does not renew the domain, the top bid wins the auction and gets the domain name.

I’m trying to get a hold a domain name that’s the name of my business. The domain is “[domainremoved].com”. I own the “.US” version of it, but I really want the “.Com” version. It’s been registered since 2009 by Proxy Tech Privacy Services with Alpine Domains (registrar) and is expiring next month. They aren’t using the domain for anything other than a rip-off service to make websites. I got a quote to see how much they are charging for just the domain and it’s in the thousands! Ridiculous!!!
The easiest way to see that is to go to HREFs and look at the anchor text. It reveals right away whether or not the site has been spammed. You also want to see if it’s been SEO’d too much. Right? In this case, it’s not because it has a brand name here and some natural keywords, but if the number one anchor text was like, cell phone management system and then the next one was like cheap cell phone management system, you’d know that the anchor text was manipulated and probably overly SEO’d. So, what you want as a site that has a natural link profile.

Alternatively, you can monitor a domain name for free at a number of locations. DomainTools.com offers a free domain name monitor tool, as does DomainHole.com (both available with free member registration). Once you receive an email notification that a domain has changed status from active to expired, you can follow the process listed above to enter a bid at the auction partner site.
If you bid at NameJet *after* the domain name moves to Pending Delete status, then it’s too late for NameJet to take advantage of their relationship with eNom and take control of the name. So then eNom thinks, “no interest from NameJet users; we’ll just drop it” and it goes through the regular deletion process — where the fastest fingers can register it. In some cases, investors don’t want to pay the $59 or $69 fee at NameJet and if there are no bids they can likely get it for $18.99 at Pheenix or using other dropcatching services.

What DomCop does for you, is show you a list of all these domains along with important metrics for every domain. These metrics, along with our powerful filtering and sorting capabilities, will help reduce the size of the daily list from 200,000+ to just a handful of the very best domains. What would take you hours, will now literally take you seconds to do.
So, you paste the domain into here and click on the search domains button. This will show you more information about the pending delete status domain. In this case, you have to order by June 13th and today is the 10th. So, you have three days and you just add it to your cart as if you’re just buying anything online. Just check it off and click add to cart. It’s added to your cart and they will try to get it on your behalf.
So, you paste the domain into here and click on the search domains button. This will show you more information about the pending delete status domain. In this case, you have to order by June 13th and today is the 10th. So, you have three days and you just add it to your cart as if you’re just buying anything online. Just check it off and click add to cart. It’s added to your cart and they will try to get it on your behalf.
Since high quality expired domains are in low supply, the huge numbers of marketers competing for those drop domains tend to drive prices up. Also, if you use an exchange, you’re basically lucky to get whatever you can afford. In other words, niche specificity isn't guaranteed. This is going to be a problem because as Google continues to evolve, it is cracking down on domain niche relevance. In other words, its software is fast evolving to the point that it can tell what the niche of a particular domain is. If your private blog network is a patchwork of expired domains that involve many different and dissimilar niches, then you might be in trouble. You are at great risk of being penalized by Google.
I like to also click on the No Fake PR’s and No Unsure PR’s because a lot of fake page rank or page rank that’s been manipulated in the past and you want to make sure any authority that you see is real. Once you’ve picked all the criteria you want to choose, click on the apply filter button. This took our list from two million to 237. Now, even within that, that’s kind of overwhelming.
Why does this matter? What's the big deal? Well, unfortunately, the vast majority of domains registered are eventually abandoned. For some reason or another, people just fail to re-register or renew their domain name and that domain name drops or becomes available to the public. Of course, the obvious reason is that these people simply did not make money off the website that they put up with that domain. Other bloggers and website owners simply don't have the time, so they just gave up on their online projects. Whatever the case may be, by simply registering these expired domains, you can resurrect the value they bring to the table. With the four situations that I outlined above, you can benefit from those situations by simply registering a drop domain.
Lately I've noticed a lot of questions in Q&A centering on purchasing expired domains. A lot of our members have expressed interest in buying old domains for a variety of prices (some are cheap, some are going for upwards of $50k) and want some advice on what to do with the domains once they've been purchased. I'm no domainer, nor am I an expert in such a business tactic, but I generally recommend one of three different options for an expired domain (and would love to hear more if you've got any).
Okay, so let's run it. I'm just going to copy those in there to give it a bit of a kick start, but I'm on modern fiber UK fiber, so that might actually be too slow still, but yeah just trial and error with the amoount of crawlng threads, because it depends what kind of resources your PC has, and what kind of connection you're on. Okay, so we'll come back in a minute, oh by the way also, you can get the DA and the PA for each result for any of the crawl types. As long as you put in your MOZ key in the settings, so I just paused the video because I want to play around with the settings, because I haven't used this on my home fibre and I found on my UK fibre, these things worked pretty well but, like I said it will vary from connection to connection and machines to machine as well. So because I want some results to show you pretty quickly. I swapped it for website list and we're going to crawl some directories because they're always really good for finding tons of expired domains.

Now the numbers of errors, for we give up crawling a web site in case you know, they've got some kind of anti scraping technology or the web sites just completely knackered or something thirty is generally fine. Limit number of pages crawled per website most the time you want that ticked. I have it about a hundred thousand less you are going to be crawling some particularly big websites. I like that there, because, if you have an endless, crawl and there's some kind of weird URL structure on a website like an old-school date picker or something you don't want to be endlessly stuck on that website. Show your URLs being crawled. Now, if you just want to see what it's doing, you can have it on for debugging sometimes, but I generally leave it off because it makes it slightly faster and writes results into a text file so as it goes along and it finds expired domains as well as showing you and the GUI here, you can write them into a text file just in case there's a crash or your PC shuts down or something like that.
Alternatively, you can monitor a domain name for free at a number of locations. DomainTools.com offers a free domain name monitor tool, as does DomainHole.com (both available with free member registration). Once you receive an email notification that a domain has changed status from active to expired, you can follow the process listed above to enter a bid at the auction partner site.
The way this list is implemented means I can't update prices, nor removed sold domains automatically and sedo doesn't provide me with the tools I need to implement it properly. Unfortunately some users keep contacting me to update their domain prices or remove their domains and I can't keep doing that manually. So I've decided to disable the list for now.
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